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Standing left to right - Patrick J. McNally, 

Edward B. Rauscher, Chair, and James W. Foley 

Sitting - Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Ingrid F. Miles 



Cover photo: Sawmill Point on County Street 



For three centuries, Sawmill Point was the site of 
gristmills, fulling mills, and sawmills powered by the 
Lower Falls of the Ipswich River. Through the foresight 
of Alice Shurcliff and the efforts of Charles Shurcliff, 
this park now stands as a window to the river and to the 
history of Ipswich. 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

.2005 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 5 

April 4, 2005 Annual Town Meeting 10 

October 17, 2005 Special Town Meeting 25 

Board of Selectmen 55 

Town Manager 57 

Department of Public Safety 59 

Police Department 59 

Fire Department 60 

Animal Control 62 

Harbors 63 

Shellfish 64 

Emergency Management 65 

Department of Public Works 66 

Public Works Divisions 66 

Facilities Department 69 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 70 

Department of Code Enforcement 71 

Building Department 71 

Health Department 72 

Zoning Board of Appeals 73 

Department of Planning and Development 74 

Planning Board 77 

Conservation Commission 78 

Historical Commission 80 

Housing Partnership 83 

Department of Human Services 84 

Recreation Department 84 

Youth Services 87 

Council on Aging 88 

Veterans Services 90 

Department of Utilities 91 

Electric Department 91 

Water Division 92 

Water Filtration Plant 93 

Wastewater Treatment 94 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

Finance Directorate 95 

Accounting Office 95 

Treasurer/Collector 96 

Assessors Office .. 96 

Town Clerk 97 

Elections and Registrations 101 

MIS Department 102 

Purchasing/Budget/Risk Management 103 

Ipswich Public Library 104 

School Department 108 

Ipswich Housing Authority 121 

Ipswich Cultural Council 122 

Open Space Committee 122 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 123 

Bay Circuit Trail Committee 124 

Trust Fund Commission ■ . . . 125 

Town of Ipswich Americans With Disabilities Act 126 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2005 ... 127 



2006-2007 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Edward Rauscher 


2008 


James Foley 


2006 


Patrick McNally 


2008 


Elizabeth Kilcoyne 


2007 


Ingrid Miles 


2007 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Joan Arsenault,Ch 


2007 


Edmund Traverso 


2008 


Norman Sheppard 


2008 


Hugh 0' Flynn 


2006 


Dianne Ross 


2006 


Jeffrey Loeb 


2007 


Barry Hopping 


2008 



E2 



03 



Ray Morley, Whittier Rep E 

CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 2006 

TOWN MODERATOR 

A. James Grimes 2006 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Elected at Town Meeting 
Daniel Clasby,Ch 2008 
Robert White 2006 
Marion Swan 2007 

Appointed by Moderator 
Jamie Fay 2008 

William Craft 2006 
Clark Ziegler 2007 
Appointed by Selectmen 
Janice Clements-Skelton *0E 
Diane Linehan 2006 
Raymond Morley 2007 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kenneth Blades 2008 

Tone Kenney 2010 

Robert Como 2 00 6 

Sara O'Connor 2009 

Edgar Turner 2006 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER M 

Robert Markel 
SI FINANCE DIR./TOWN ACCT. 

Rita Negri Ml 

SI UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Tim Henry Ml 

SI TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Kevin Merz Ml 

Ml ELECTRIC DEPT. MANAGER 

Vacant position Ml 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank Ragonese Ml 

Ml CODE INFORCEMENT 

BUILDING INSPECTOR M 

James Sperber 

Eric Colville, Asst. M 
Ml DIRECTOR OF PLANNING 

TOWN PLANNER M 

Glenn Gibbs 

Kate Day, Asst. 



HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski 

Charles Schwartz, Deputy 

HEALTH AGENT 

Colleen Fermon 

LIBRARIAN 

Victor Dyer 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 

TOWN CLERK 

Pamela Carakatsane 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Robert Gravino 

FIRE CHIEF 

Will Maker, Acting 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPT. 

James Graffum 

COUNCIL ON AGING DIRECT. 

Diane Mitchell 



Ml DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC M 

SAFETY, POLICE CHIEF 

Charles Surpitski 7 
Ml PARKING CLERK 

Corinna Warner M 

M ASST. PURCHASING AGENT/ 

RISK MANAGEMENT COORD. 

Jane Spellman 



SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip Kent 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard Korb 
DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES 

Joe Lucido 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERIES AND PARKS 
COMMISSION 

Arthur Sotis 2006 
Nicholas Markos 2008 
Theodore LeMieux 2007 

M CIVIL DEFENSE /EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT 
Charles Cooper 2006 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 2006 
Joseph Carlin 2006 
Robert Waldner 2006 
M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
David Pancoast, Agent 
Glenn Wood 2008 

Brian O'Neill 2008 
David Standley 2006 
Jennifer Hughes 2006 
Barbara Beaman 2006 
Ann McMenemy 2007 
Sissy ffolliott 2007 
Associates : 

Sharon Cushing 2006 
Cynthia Ingelfinger 2006 

S FAIR HOUSING 
Sara O'Connor 
Tone Kenney 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Elizabeth Nelson 2008 
Cheryl Ferris 2008 
Patricia Parady 2007 
Carol Emerson-Owen 2006 
Tone Kenney 2007 

Carol Poirier 2006 
Dorothy Chulyk-Butcher2008 



2006 
2006 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Kathleen O'Reilly 2008 
Rebecca Gayton 2008 
Kamora Herrington 2009 
Michelle Shibley-McGrath' 09 
Dorothy Laurence, Ch 2007 
Robin Siilverman 2008 
Priscilla Herrington 2007 
Peggy Graney 2008 
Pamela Horwath 2009 
Pamela Turnbull 2010 
Sunny West 2010 

Terri linger 2008 
LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Robert Weatherall 2008 
Lawrence Pszenny 2008 
M.L. Scudder 2008 
George Gray 2006 

Judith Rusin 2006 
Philip Kuhn 2007 
William Thoen 2007 
Marion Frost 2007 
Nancy Thompson 2006 
TRUST FUND COMMISSION 
Walter Pojasek 2008 
Jean Emerson 2006 
Robert Weatherall 2007 
GOVERNMENT STUDY COM. 
Jeremy Hathaway 2006 
Gerry Anne Brown 2006 
David Standley 2006 
Dana Ryan 2006 

Laura Dietz 2006 
Al Boynton 2006 

Laura Hamilton 2006 



S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Elizabeth McCarthy 2008 
Robert Stone 2006 
Philip Grenier 2007 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Joseph McCarthy 2006 
John Pelletier 2006 
Evan Parker 2006 

Michael Lambros, Ch 2006 
Joseph Kmiec 2006 
Anthony Murawski 2006 
Frank Michon 2006 

M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank Ragonese 2008 
John Moberger 2006 
Karen Rassias 2007 

S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COM. 
Ken Spellman,Ch 2006 
Jeffrey French 2007 
Ronald Cameron 2008 
John Wigglesworth 2007 
Elton McCausland 2007 
Evan Parker 2008 
Bill Callahan 2006 

M PLANNING BOARD 

Charles Allen 2007 
Robert Weatherall 2005 
Michael Ryan 2006 
John Soininen 2008 
Timothy Purinton 2009 
Emily Levin, Assoc. 2007 

S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Dana Jordan 2006 

Roger LeBlanc 2007 
Benjamin Fierro 2009 
Kevin Lombard 2010 
Robert Gambale,Ch 2008 
Tim Perkins (Alt. ) 2006 
Robert Bodwell (Alt .) 2006 

3 OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Ralph Williams 2006 
Douglas DeAngelis 2006 
Carl Nylen 2006 

Glenn Hazelton,Ch 2006 
Ruth Sherwood 2 00 6 
David Standley 2006 
Carolyn Britt 2006 



M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Walter Pojasek 2006 
Wilma Gooby 2008 

John Moss, Ch 2008 
Peter Lampropoulos 2006 
June Gahan 2006 

Marjorie Robie 2007 
Matthew Cummings 2007 
HALL -HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott 2006 
Theresa Stephens 2006 
Peg Burr 2006 

William Thoen 2006 
Stephanie Gaskins 2006 
Margaret Broekel 2006 
Ed Sukach 2006 

James Lahar 2006 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
Carl Hiltunen 2008 



M 



M 



M 



Spencer Amesbury,MD 2006 

Susan Hubbard 2007 
RECREATION 

Edith Cook 2008 

Bruce Bryant 2006 

Kerrie Bates 2006 

Robert Donahue 2006 

Kathryn Sheppard 2007 

Dan McCormick 2007 

Christina Mercier 2008 

COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 

Michael Schaff 2006 
SANDY POINT ADVISORY 

Joseph Parks 2006 

Stanley Wood 2006 
IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT 

Lawrence Eliot 2006 

Mary Cunningham 2 00 6 

James Clark 2006 

Patrick Glennon 2006 

Norman Marsh 2006 

Barbara Ostberg 2006 

Ralph Williams 2006 

Linda Coan 2006 

INDUSTRIAL DEVEL . FINANCE 

James Lahar 2009 

Robert Markel 2006 



M 



CABLE TELEVISION ADVIS. 

Robert Markel 2006 

Arthur Savage 2006 

Joseph Parks 2006 

Al Boynton 2006 
William Ford, Jr. 2006 

Greg Parachojuk 2006 

Thomas Lohnes 2006 

Edmund Traverso 2006 

Robert Ryan, Ch 2006 

Robert White 2006 

Ingrid Miles 2006 

Robert Stone 2006 
MOSQUITO CONTROL ADVIS. 



Lisa Galanis 

Ian Forman 

Ed Ruta 

Ernest Brockelbank 

Ann Wallace 

Robert Gambale 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf 

James Warner 

Michael Jones 

Donald Greenough 

Edward Dick 

Karen Wallen 

Jay Gallagher 

Donald Bowen 

ATHLETIC PLAYING FIELDS 

STUDY COMMITTEE 

James Foley 

Beth O'Connor 

Carl Nylen 

Jack Desmond 

James Graffum 

Ken Swenson 

Susan Markos 

Tom Gallagher 

Elizabeth Dorman 

IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 

DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD 
David Standley 2006 



2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 

2006 
2005 

2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 



2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 
2006 



S ACTION, INC. 

Tone Kenney 2006 

Charlotte Dodge 2006 

S FEOFFEES COMMITTEE 

Robert Bonsignore 2006 

Barry Hopping 2006 

Paul Surpitski 2006 

Robert Weatherall 2006 

Harvey Schwartz 2006 

Robert White 2006 
Vacant 

S AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND 

James Warner 2006 

Elton McCausland 2007 

Michael Schaaf 2008 

Susan Monahan 2008 

S AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Mario Marini 2006 

Laura Russell, Ch 2006 

Fred Winthrop 2006 

Ted Raymond 2006 

Donald Galicki 2006 

David Wegzyn 2006 

Royce Knowlton 2006 
DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

09 Thomas Troller ■ 2007 

09 Maiya Dos 2008 

S Dianna Pacella 2008 

S Chris Saulnier 2009 

08 Matthew Cummings 2009 

S Mary Kroesser 2007 

S Ken Savoie 2008 

S RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Mark Avenmarg 2006 

Adam Pepper 2006 

Renato DeLorenzo 2006 

Suzanne Benfield 2006 

Bill Graham 2006 

Penny Devoe 2006 
Associates : 

Joanne Delaney 2006 

Phillip Grenier . 2006 

Nancy DelOrfano 2006 

Jeremy Hathaway 2006 



PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES 


S 


COMMITTEE 






James Foley 


2006 




Edward Dick 


2006 




Charles Surpitski 


2006 




Elizabeth Kilcoyne 


2006 




William Thoen 


2006 




Paul McGinley 


2006 




Roland Gallant 


2006 




John Morris 


2006 




Sean Cronin 


2006 




Willard Maker 


2006 




Jamie Fay 


2006 




COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 




PLAN IMPLEMENTATION 


E 


TASK FORCE 




S 


Web Bingham 


2006 




Douglas DeAngeles 


2006 


M 


William Gallagher 


2006 




Richard Kallman 


2006 





Thomas Mayo 


2006 


1 


Ingrid Miles 


2006 




Glenn Gibbs 


2006 


2 


Kate Day 


2006 


3 

4 
5 
6 



SHADE TREE & BEAUT I FI CAT I ON 
COMMITTEE 

Edward Rauscher 2006 

James Foley 2006 

Robert Gravino 2006 

Benjamin Staples 2006 

Armand Michaud 2006 

Daniel Morrow 2006 

Denise King 2006 

Janet Craft 2006 

Marie Rodgers 2006 

Roxann Giddings 2006 

Judith Rusin 2006 

^ Elected 

= Appointed by Board of 

Selectmen 
- Appointed by Town 

Manager 
= Other 
= Supervised by Town 

Manager 
= Elected at Town Meeting 
= Appointed by Moderator 
= General Laws 
= 1976 STM, Article II 
= Confirmed by Board of 

Selectmen 
7 = Appointed by School 

Committee 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 4, 2005 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the 
Performing Arts Center of the IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL/IPSWICH HIGH 
SCHOOL, 134 High Street in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE FOURTH OF APRIL, 
2005, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the 372 nd Annual Town Meeting to order at 7:41 p.m. 
with 215 voters present. The final count was 437 at 9:00 p.m. Richard Korb, 
Superintendent of Schools, led the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. It was moved, 
seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. Mr. Grimes informed the voters about town 
meeting procedures, the bake sale in the lobby and emergency exits. Deborah Eliason 
from Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. 



ARTICLE 1 CONSENT 

CALENDAR 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town 
Officers; (2) to choose the following officers, viz: Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] 
Selectmen for three [3] years; three [3] members of the School Committee for three [3] 
years; and one [1] member of the Housing Authority for five [5] years; and one ballot 
referendum question which is printed at the end of this warrant, the above officers to be 
voted on one ballot at the YMCA Hall, County Road, on Tuesday, April 12, 2005; the 
polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to act on the transfer of any 
surplus funds in the Electric Division, Department of Utilities; and (4) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to temporarily appoint a member of said Board to Acting Town 
Manager for a limited period of time not to exceed the date of the 2006 Annual Town 
Meeting for purposes of vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 268 A, sections 20 and 2 1 A; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that Town vote: (1) to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elected Town Officers as presented in the town and school operating 
budgets; (2) to choose the following officers, viz: Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] 
Selectmen for three [3] years; three [3] members of the School Committee for three [3] 
years; and one [1] member of the Housing Authority for five [5] years; the above officers 



10 



to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 1 10 County Road, on TUESDAY, 
APRIL 12, 2005; the polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 p.m.; (3) to 
transfer $275,051 from surplus funds in the Electric Division; and (4) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to appoint temporarily a member of said Board to Acting Town 
Manager for a limited period of time not to exceed the date of the 2006 Annual Town 
Meeting for purposes of vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 268 A, sections 20 and 21 A. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 2 FINANCE COMMITTEE 

ELECTION 

To see if the Town will vote to choose: (1) one [1] member of the Finance Committee for 
three [3] years; and (2) one [1] member of the Finance Committee for two [2] years. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Finance Committee member Clark Ziegler moved that the Town elect Daniel Clasby to 
the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. Seconded. Mr. Ziegler moved that 
the town elect Marion Swan to the Finance Committee for a term of two (2) years to fill 
an unexpired term left vacant. Seconded. 

Finance Committee unanimously recommended. With no further nominations from the 
floor, it was moved, seconded and so voted to close the nominations. Motion to elect 
Daniel Clasby for a term of three years and Marion Swan to a term of two years on the 
Finance Committee carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 3 FY'05 TOWN BUDGET 

AMENDMENTS 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 9 of the April 5, 
2004, Annual Tov/n Meeting (the FY05 Municipal Operating Budget), as amended by 
Article 1 of the October 18, 2004, Special Tov/n Meeting: (a) by transferring sums of 
money between departmental accounts and/or by consolidating categories within 
departmental accounts, the total appropriation to remain the same as previously 
appropriated as a result of these transfers and/or consolidations; and (b) by appropriating 
additional sums, offset by available funds; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 9 of the April 5, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'05 Municipal Operating 
Budget), as amended by Article 1 of the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting to 
transfer: 



11 



Treasurer 
Treasurer 


Expense 
Capital 


Emergency Mgmnt 
Police 


Salaries 
Salaries 


Historical Comm 

Planning 

Planning 


Expenses 
Expenses 
Salaries 


Fire 
Fire 


Expenses 
Salaries 


Police 
Police 


Expenses 
Salaries 


Selectmen 
Town Manager 
Misc Finance 
Misc Finance 
Treasurer 
Legal 


Expenses 

Expenses 

Expenses 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Expenses 


Purchasing 
Conservation Comm 
Purchasing 


Expenses 

Capital 

Capital 


Forestry 
Highway 
PW Admin 


Salaries 
Salaries 
Salaries 


Consolidated Bldg 
District Court 


Expenses 
Expenses 


Consolidated Bldg 
Consolidated Bldg 


Salaries 
Expenses 



(5,000) 


5,000 


(1,000) 


1,000 


(300) 
(1,000) 


1,300 


(10,600) 


10,600 


(11,000) 


11,000 


(3,904) 

(11,586) 

(1,398) 

(10,412) 

(700) 


28,000 


(750) 
(4,100) 


4,850 


(1,700) 
(1,700) 


3,400 


(3,000) 


3,000 


(10,000) 





10,000 



so that the total municipal operating budget as so amended and inclusive of override debt 
service shall total $1 1,935,082 offset by revenues totaling $860,359 leaving an amount to 
be raised and assessed of $1 1,074,723. Seconded. 

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



12 



ARTICLE 4 FY'05 WATER AND SEWER BUDGET 

AMENDMENTS 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of money in addition to the sums 
already having been appropriated under Article 13 of the April 5, 2004, Annual Town 
Meeting as amended by action taken under Article 2 of the October 18, 2004, Special 
Town Meeting (the FY05 Water and Sewer Division Budgets), said sums to be raised by 
transferring equal sums, respectively, from Water and Sewer Surplus; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 
13 of the April 5, 2004, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'05 Water and Wastewater 
Budgets) as amended by Article 2 of the October 18, 2004, Special Town Meeting by 
increasing the water division appropriation from $1,909,391 to $1,986,391, said increase 
of $77,000 to be offset by transfer of an equal sum from Water Surplus. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 5 MUNICIPAL BUDGET REVOLVING FUNDS: 

BUILDING; 

AGING: HEALTH DIVISION 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to re-authorize for FY06 the following revolving funds 
established under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E ! /2: (a) Building 
Department permit revenues (net of plumbing and gas fees) collected in excess of 
$150,000, the purpose of said fund being to finance additional part-time help in the 
Building Department and other related expenditures, and to determine that no more than 
$40,000 may be expended by the Building Department in FY06 from such excess funds 
transferred into such revolving fund; (b) Council on Aging activity fees, the use of said 
fund to pay for special activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, and to 
determine that no more than $10,000 may be expended by the Council on Aging from 
monies transferred into said fund during FY06; (c) Historical Commission Revolving 
Fund, the use of said fund to be to pay for preservation of Town records and to purchase 
expendable supplies, and to determine that no more than $5,000 may be expended by the 
Historical Commission from monies transferred into said fund during FY06 (source of 
funds: sale of publications); and (d) Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of said fund 
to finance additional part-time help in the Health Division and to pay related 
expenditures, and to determine that no more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health 
Division in FY06 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during FY06 (source 
of funds: Housing Code Inspection Fees); or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: Town Manager) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote: to re-authorize for FY'06 the 
following revolving funds established under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, 



13 



Section 53E Vi: 1) A Building Department Revolving Fund to permit revenues (net of 
plumbing and gas fees) collected in excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund being to 
finance additional part-time help in the Building Department and other related 
expenditures, and to determine that no more than $40,000 may be expended by the 
Building Department in FY'06 from such excess funds transferred into such revolving 
fund; 2) A Council on Aging Revolving Fund, to be funded through activity fees. The 
COA Fund may be used to pay for special activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time 
wages. No more than $10,000 may be expended by the Council on Aging from monies 
transferred into said fund during FY'06; 3) An Historical Commission Revolving Fund, 
to pay for preservation of Town records and to purchase expendable supplies. No more 
than $5,000 may be expended by the Historical Commission from monies transferred into 
said fund during FY'06. The source of funds shall be the sale of publications, such as 
replicas of the Declaration of Independence; and 4) A Health Division Revolving Fund, 
the use of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health Division and to pay 
related expenditures. No more than $7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in 
FY'06 from such excess funds transferred into said fund during FY'06. The source of 
funds shall be housing code inspection fees. Seconded. 

The Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 6 PRIOR YEAR UNPAID 

BILLS 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from available funds to pay 
unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate the sum of $159.00 
to pay bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Department, Category & Vendor Amount 

Code Enforcement expenses: 

Landlaw Specialty Publishers $159.00 

And to meet this appropriation by raising $159.00 in taxes. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. On a hand 
count with one against and more than tv/enty in favor, the Moderator declared the motion 
passed by the required 4/5ths majority vote. 



14 



ARTICLE 7 FY'06 MUNICIPAL OPERATING 

BUDGET 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the municipal 
budget, and to raise, appropriate, transfer money from available funds, and change the 
purpose of the unexpended balances of prior appropriations, all to be used for the ensuing 
year's operations, including the compensation of elected Town officers, and to authorize 
the Town to enter into lease-purchase contracts for office equipment having a term of five 
years or less; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Finance Committee Chairman Dan Clasby moved that the Town vote: 
(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1 1,155,629 for the purposes indicated in the 
FY' 06 Municipal Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and 
that, in addition to the $1 1,155,629, the Town to raise and appropriate: 

for Excluded Debt Service $1,036,820- 

for a Total Appropriation of. $12,196,714 

and 2) to transfer from available funds: 

from Free Cash $156,680 

from Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) $ 1 0,5 1 5 

from Plum Is. National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes 

$20,022 

from 4% Tourism $689 

from Open Space Recreation Fund (stewardship position) 

$17,701 

from Library Construction Grant $60,300 

from the overlay surplus $ 219,459 

Total Available 

Funds $485,366 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of. 

$11,711,348 
Seconded. 

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 8 FY'06 MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET 

AMENDMENT 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 7 (Municipal Operating Budget) for FY'06 
to appropriate $12,873 to the Harbormaster budget for the replacement of a 25 hp 



15 



outboard motor and a jet ski and to meet this appropriation by transferring $12,873 from 
the Waterways Improvement Fund. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town will vote to amend Article 7 
(Municipal Operating Budget) for FY'06 to appropriate $12,873 to the Harbormaster 
budget for the replacement of a 25 hp outboard motor and a jet ski and to meet this 
appropriation by transferring $12,873 from the Waterways Improvement Fund. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. Finance Committee voted 6 to 1 in 
favor. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 9 HIGH SCHOOL/MIDDLE SCHOOL DEBT 

SERVICE 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money for debt service 
payments and other costs related to the construction and furnishing of the new middle 
school and high school including, without limitation, moving expenses and expenses 
necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School; and (2) to determine whether 
said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from available funds, or otherwise; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: School Committee) 

School Committee member Dr. Hugh O'Flynn moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,585,728 for FY'06 debt service payments related to the 
construction and furnishing of the new middle school and high school including, without 
limitation, moving expenses and expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple 
Middle School. Seconded. 

School Committee, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen unanimously 

recommended. 

Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 10 FY'06 SCHOOL 

BUDGET 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School Committee 
relative to the FY'06 School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, transfer money 
from available funds, and change the purpose of the unexpended balances of prior 
appropriations, all to be used for the ensuing year's operations, including entering into 
lease-purchase agreements having a duration in excess of one year, for a school bus 
and/or for other purposes; and to act upon a request to establish One or more new 
revolving funds pursuant to state law; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: School Committee) 



16 



School Committee Chairman Joan Arsenault moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $16,562,51 1 for the School Department budget for 
FY'06, and for the FY'06 School Department budget of $16,562,51 1 

(2) to transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash $156,679 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes $20,023 

Overlay Surplus $219,458 

Leaving a subtotal net to be raised and assessed of $16,166,351 

Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Ms. Arsenault, Clark Ziegler and Representative Brad Hill answered 
several questions from the voters. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote 



ARTICLE 11 GENERAL 

OVERRIDE 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 21C(g), to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,668,604 for the 
purposes of funding the FY'06 school department operating budget ($975,000) and the 
FY'06 municipal operating budget ($693,604) to purchase a replacement truck for the 
Department of Public Works, to pay for the construction of sidewalks, road and Street 
improvements, and to obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and incidental 
thereto; said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referendum 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(m); or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by the Board of Selectmen and School 
Committee) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C(g), to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,668,604 for the purposes of funding the FY'06 school department operating 
budget ($975,000) and the FY'06 municipal operating budget ($693,604) to purchase a 
replacement truck for the Department of Public Works, to pay for the construction of 
sidewalks, road and street improvements, and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
necessary and incidental thereto; said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of 
an override referendum under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, 
Section 21C(m); or to take any other action relative thereto. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen, School Committee and Finance Committee unanimously 

recommended. 

Selectman James Foley, School Committee member Barry Hopping and Finance 

Committee member Jamie Fay spoke in favor of the motion and recommended passage of 



17 



the override referendum on April 12 th . Several speakers spoke in favor and against the 
override. The question was moved, seconded and so voted. The main motion carried by 
a majority voice vote. 

At the Annual Town Election held at the YMCA, 1 10 County Road on April 12, 2005, 
the ballot question for the override failed with 1 ,429 in favor and 1 ,843 against. 



Moderator Grimes introduced the new Town Manager, Robert T. Markel who was 
celebrating his birthday today. Mr. Markel spoke briefly and said he appreciated the 
opportunity to serve our community. 

Mr. Grimes recognized Selectman James Foley and extended special thanks to Mr. Foley 
for filling in as Acting Town Manager. Mr. Foley received a tremendous applause in 
appreciation. 



ARTICLE 12 FY'06 WHITTIER 

BUDGET 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover the Town's 
share of the ensuing year's annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Whittier RVTHS Representative Raymond Morley) 

Finance Committee member Clark Ziegler moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $35 1,000 for the Town's share of the FY'06 annual operating, 
capital and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District. Seconded. 

Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen and School Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried by majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 13 FY'06 WATER & SEWER BUDGETS. WITH CAPITAL 

OUTLAY 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the ensuing 
year's expenses of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset by 
revenues of the Water Division during FY06; and (2) to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the ensuing year's expenses of the Sev/er Division, Department of Utilities, 
said sum to be offset by revenues of the Sewer Division during FY06; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Water/Sewer Commissioners) 



Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $2, 179,621 for the FY'06 operating, debt service, 
and capital expenses of the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset 
in part by the water surplus of $61,695, the balance of said appropriation to be met by 
revenues of the Water Division during FY'06; and 

(2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,275,272 for the FY'06 operating, debt service, 
and capital expenses of the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said 
appropriation to be met by revenues of the Wastewater Division during FY'06. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 14 WATER PROJECTS BOND 

APPROVAL 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, design, and 
construct improvements to the Town's water storage (painting of Pinefield Tank and 
fencing around Town Hill Tank) and distribution system (replacing lead services and 
water mains), water treatment facility capital repairs and equipment; and (2) to raise this 
appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, as amended; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate $1,443,000 to 
survey, design, and construct improvements to the Town's water treatment, storage and 
distribution systems; and (2) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 8, as amended. 
Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. The voice vote 
on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with three against and fifteen in favor, 
the Moderator declared the motion passed by the required 2/3rds majority vote. 



ARTICLE 15 

CHAPTER 90 



To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money under the provisions of 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws, and to obtain any materiel, equipment and/or services 
incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in 



19 



conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) in 
furtherance of the project(s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, 
and expend any federal, state and/or private grants without further appropriation thereof; 
and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested 
by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote: to appropriate the sum of $262,040 
money under the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws to obtain any materiel, 
equipment and/or services incidental thereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or 
otherwise; 

and in furtherance of the project(s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 
accept, and expend any federal, state and/or private grants without further appropriation 
thereof; and to meet this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from Chapter 90 
available funds. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 16 COMMITTEE 

REPORTS 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue such Committees as the 
Town may vote to continue; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: 
Board of Selectmen) 

The following committee reports were read, motions to continue the committees as 
standing committees of the Town, seconded and so voted: 

Public Safety Facility Study Committee by Paul McGinley 

Recycling Committee by Renato DeLorenzo 

Town Committee investigating the operations and financial records of the Feoffees of the 

Grammar School by Robert Weatherall 
Hall Haskell House Committee by Terri Stephens 
Commuter Rail Committee by Dorcas Rice 
Open Space Committee by Glenn Hazelton 
Windpower Committee by Bill Ford 
Parking Committee by Elizabeth Kilcoyne 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to continue the following committees: Historic 
District Study Committee, School Building Needs Committee, School Building 
Committee and the Ipswich Coalition for Youth. 



20 



ARTICLE 17 WASTEWATER PROJECTS BOND 

APPROVAL 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire an interest in 
fee (or lesser interest) in land now or formerly of Gladys Carter, 12 Fowlers Lane 
(Assessors Map 30B, Parcel 42), consisting of approximately 31.6 acres, for wastewater 
treatment purposes, and make capital repairs to equipment at the wastewater treatment 
plant; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen, acting as the Board of Sewer 
Commissioners, to acquire said parcel by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or 
otherwise; (3) to authorize the Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend without further 
appropriation any federal and/or state grants pertaining to said acquisition; and (4) to 
raise said appropriations by transfer from available funds and/or by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate the sum of . 
$977,000 to acquire an interest in fee (or lesser interest) in land believed to be owned by 
the estate of Gladys Carter, 12 Fowlers Lane (Assessors Map 30B, Parcel 42), consisting 
of approximately 3 1 .6 acres, for wastewater treatment purposes, and to survey design and 
construct improvements to the Town's wastewater treatment collection and pumping 
systems; and (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said parcel by purchase, 
gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) to authorize the Selectmen to apply for, 
accept and expend without further appropriation any federal and/or state grants pertaining 
to said acquisition; and (4) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7(3). Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 18 SCHOOL RENOVATION 

BONDS 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to survey, design and 
construct extraordinary repairs to the Winthrop and/or Doyon Elementary Schools, 
including original equipment and landscaping, paving and other site improvements 
incidental or directly related to such remodeling, reconstruction or repair, and to obtain 
any materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize appropriate 
tov/n officials to apply for, accept, and expend any federal and/or state grants and private 
gifts therefore; and (3) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(Requested by: School Committee) 



21 



School Committee member Dianne Ross moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate 
the sum of $200,000 to survey, design and construct extraordinary repairs to the 
Winthrop and Doyon Elementary Schools, including original equipment and landscaping, 
paving and other site improvements incidental or directly related to such remodeling, 
reconstruction or repair, and to obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and 
incidental thereto; (2) to authorize appropriate town officials to apply for, accept and 
expend any federal and/or state grants and private gifts therefore; and (3) to raise said 
appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 7 (3 A). Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. The first voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. The second vote on 
the motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



ARTICLE 19 FORMER TOWN HALL 

EASEMENTS 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept, reserve or 
convey any easements associated with the use and operation of the former Town Hall and 
the Town Police Station located in the area of Elm Street and South Main Street as shown 
on Assessors Map 42 A, Parcel 1 12, or a portion thereof, and its surrounding properties, 
said easements to be in the properties shown as Map 42 A, parcels 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13; for 
consideration to be determined by the Board of Selectmen, and on such terms and 
conditions as the Board of Selectmen may determine, or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to accept, reserve or convey any easements associated with the use and 
operation of the former Town Hall and the Town Police Station located in the area of Elm 
Street and South Main Street as shown on Assessors Map 42 A, Parcel 1 12, or a portion 
thereof, and its surrounding properties, said easements to be in the properties shown as 
Map 42 A, parcels 1 1 1, 1 12, 1 13; for consideration to be determined by the Board of 
Selectmen, and on such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may determine, 
or to take any other action relative thereto. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 92 & 94 PINESWAMP ROAD 

EASEMENTS 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of a 
portion of the land owned by the Town, located at 92R Pineswamp Road and described in 
a Final Judgment recorded with the Essex South District Registry of Deeds at Book 



22 



16769, Page 1, from the Conservation Commission to the Board of Selectmen for the 
purpose of granting a perpetual driveway easement for the benefit of the properties 
located at 92 Pineswamp Road (Essex South Registry of Deeds Book 12749, Page 597) 
and 94 Pineswamp Road, (Essex South Registry of Deeds Book 16310, Page 564), and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant said easement upon such terms and conditions 
as it shall determine appropriate; 

and further, to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition 
the Massachusetts General Court to approve the grant of said easement pursuant to the 
provisions of Article 97 of the Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, or to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, 
management and control of a portion of the town owned land described below, located at 
96 Pineswamp Road, from the Conservation Commission to the Board of Selectmen for 
the purpose of granting a nonexclusive, perpetual driveway and utility easement solely 
for the benefit of the properties located at 92 Pineswamp Road (Essex South Registry of 
Deeds Book 12749, Page 597) and 94 Pineswamp Road, (Essex South Registry of Deeds 
Book 16310, Page 564), and to authorize the Board of Selectmen, with the approval of 
the Conservation Commission, to grant said easement upon such terms and conditions as 
it shall determine appropriate. The transferred land is described as follows: 

So much of the town land, described in a Final Judgment recorded with the Essex 
South District Registry of Deeds at Book 16769, Page 1, lying within the tract 
described below as beginning at the northwesterly corner on the southerly sideline 
of Pineswamp Road continuing easterly 55 feet along Pineswamp Road then turning 
S 06 degrees 08' 26" East for a distance of 405 feet, thence 55 feet westerly; then 
turning North 06 degrees 08' 26" W for a distance of 405 feet to the point of 
beginning, as is currently occupied by an existing driveway providing access to 
the properties described above including a width of land not more than 10 feet to 
either side of the centerline of the existing driveway except as may be necessary 
to accommodate 

existing utility poles, and extending not more than 350 feet southerly from the 
southerly sideline of Pineswamp Road. 

And further, to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, with the 
approval of the Conservation Commission, to petition the Massachusetts General Court to 
approve the grant of said easement pursuant to the provisions of Article 97 of the 
Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Conservation 
Committee Chairman David Standley said that the Commission determined that the 
portion of that land is no longer needed for conservation purposes. 

Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 



23 



ARTICLE 21 



RECONSIDERATION 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 
appropriating money which have a direct impact on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal 
year, as contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a budget which is 
balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2 Vi, so called; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Requested by: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to adjourn the annual town meeting. Meeting 
adjourned at 1 1 :40 p.m. 



The voters are further warned that the following additional question shall be on the 
printed ballot for the April 12, 2005, elections to be held at the YMCA Hall County 
Road, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.: 

"Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional $1,668,604 in real estate 
and personal property taxes for the purposes of funding the FY'06 school department 
operating budget ($975,000) and the FY'06 municipal operating budget ($693,604) to 
purchase a replacement truck for the Department of Public Works, to pay for the 
construction of sidewalks, road and street improvements, and to obtain any materiel 
and/or services necessary and incidental thereto, for the fiscal year beginning July 1 , 
2005? Yes / / No / 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the Post 
Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days 
prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, or having a 
general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this seventh day of March in the year of our Lord, Two Thousand 
and Five. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Edward B. Rauscher 
James W. Foley 
Patrick J. McNally 
Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 
Ingrid F. Miles 



24 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 17,2005 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County: 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Performing Arts Center of the Ipswich High School/Ipswich Middle School, 134 High 
Street, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH OF OCTOBER, 2005, at 
7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following articles, viz: 

After several fifteen minute adjournments, Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to 
order at 8:10 p.m. with 200 voters present. The final count was 237 at 9 p.m. Following 
the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag, Mr. Grimes informed the voters about town meeting 
procedures and appointed the following tellers: Jean Engel, Chris Cullen and Michelle 
Jollissee. It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. Deborah Eliason 
from Kopelman and Paige was Town Counsel. This was the last town meeting for 
retiring Town Clerk Frances A. Richards. The town meeting was broadcast live on Cable 
TV thanks to the students at the High School. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action previously taken under Article 7 of the 
April 04, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'06 Municipal Operating Budget), as 
further amended by Article 8 of the April 04, 2005 Annual Town Meeting, by 
appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said Articles 7 and 8 
(said appropriation to be raised by taxes, by transfer of available funds or otherwise), by 
transferring sums between departments and/or categories within departments; and/or by 
determining if a portion of said additional appropriations shall be offset by estimated 
receipts of user fees, in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Sec. 53EV2; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of 
Selectmen) 

Selectman James Foley moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under Article 
7 of the April 4, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'06 Municipal Operating Budget), 
as follows: 

1) transfer $7,400 from Free Cash to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, 
Audit Account (193-5302) to cover a shortfall in the FY'06 operating budget 
for the Fiscal 2005 annual audit. 



25 



2) transfer $1 1, 551 said sum to be offset by a transfer of $1 1,551 from the 
Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account (192-5742) to be added to 
the Health Department, Salaries Account (512-5112) to cover the cost of the 
Health Agent's temporary replacement; and 

3) transfer $4,725 from the Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account 
(192-5742) to be added to the Conservation Commission, Salaries Account 
(173-51 12) to pay the cost of temporarily replacing the Conservation 
Commission Agent; and 

4) transfer $18,000 from the Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account 
(192-5742) $12,000 to be added to the Town Clerk, Salaries & Wages 
Account (161-51 12) and $6,000 to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, 
Health Insurance Account (191-5175) to cover the cost of salary and health 
benefits for the new Town Clerk; and 

5) transfer $1 ,300 from the Planning Department, Temporary Part Time Salaries 
Account (171-5121) to be added to the Planning Department, Other 
Consultants Account (171-531 1) to cover the cost of a temporary consultant 
(intern) in the Planning Department; and 

6) transfer $300 from the Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account 
(192-5742) to be added to the Town Manager, Temporary Part Time Salaries 
Account (123-51 16) to pay the cost of secretarial services for the Audit 
Committee; and 

7) transfer $17,000 from the Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account 
(192-5742) to be added to the Animal Control Budget, Salaries & Wages 
Account (292-51 12) to pay salary and benefits of the new Animal Control 
Officer; and 

8) transfer $1,250 from Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account 
(192-5742) to be added to the Town Manager, Consultants Account (123- 
5310) to pay the cost of municipal benchmarking reports for the Police and 
Fire Departments; and 

9) transfer from the Miscellaneous Finance, Package Insurance Account (192- 
5742) $1,000 to be added to the Town Manager, Training Account (123-551 1) 
to cover the expense of the facilitator for the September 6 Board of Selectmen, 
Town Manager and Department Heads retreat; and 

1 0) transfer $20,000 from Free Cash to be added to the Town Manager, 
Consultants Account (123-5310) to retain special legal counsel to negotiate a 
new contract for cable TV; and 






26 



1 1) transfer $4,550 from Free Cash to be added to the Shellfish Department, 
Turnout Equipment Account (296-5582) to cover the cost of enhancements to 
the Town's shellfish resources; and 

12) transfer $20,000 from the Miscellaneous Finance, Management Transfer 
Account (193-51 10) to Town Manager, Consultants Account (123-5310) to 
pay the cost of a study of the Town's classification and compensation system; 
and 

13) transfer $19,700 from the Building Inspector Revolving Account, $1 1,325 to 
be added to the Building Inspector, Salaries & Wages Account (251-51 15) 
and $8,375 to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, Health Insurance 
Account (191-5175) to cover the cost of 17 54 additional hours of additional 
administrative support for the Building Department; and 

14) raise and appropriate $76,000 to be added to the Department of Public Works 
Equipment Maintenance Gasoline Account (14222-5215) 

so that the total Fiscal 2006 municipal operating budget, as so amended and inclusive of 
override debt service shall total: $12,324,364, offset by non-tax revenues totaling: 
$537,016, leaving a net to be raised and appropriated: $1 1,787,348. Seconded. 

Board of Selectman and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money under the provisions of 
Chapter 90 of the General laws, and to obtain any material, equipment and/or services 
incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in 
conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) in 
furtherance of the project(s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, 
and expend any federal, state and/or private grants without further appropriation thereof; 
and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by taxes, by transfer from 
available funds, or by borrowing; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote to amend its action taken under 
Article 15 of the April 04, 2005, Annual Tov/n Meeting (Chapter 90 appropriation), by 
increasing the Chapter 90 appropriation by $262,080 so that the total Chapter 90 
appropriation for FY'06 totals $524,120. Seconded. 

Board of Selectman and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



27 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 10 of the Warrant for 
the April 04, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 06 School Department Operating 
Budget) by appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated under said 
Article 10, said funds to be transferred from free cash; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (Sponsor: School Committee) 

School Committee member Dr. Hugh O'Flynn moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 10 of the April 04, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'06 
School Operating Budget), by transferring of a sum of $34,909 from free cash, so that the 
total appropriation under this article shall increase from $16,562,511 to $16,597,420. 
Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 10 of the Warrant for 
the April 04, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY06 School Department Operating 
Budget), as further amended by Article 3 of the Warrant for the October 17, 2005, 
Special Town Meeting, by appropriating a sum of money in addition to that appropriated 
under the aforesaid Articles 10 and 3, respectively, said appropriation to be raised by 
taxes, or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: School 
Committee) 

School Committee member Jeff Loeb moved that the Town vote to amend its action 
taken under Article 10 of the April 04, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'06 School 
Operating Budget), in addition to that appropriated under the aforesaid Article 3, that a 
sum of $83,462 be added from available Chapter 70 funds; and to appropriate $114,000 
said appropriations to be raised by taxes, so that the total appropriation under this article 
will increase from $16,597,420 to $16, 794,882. Seconded. 

School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its action taken under Article 12 of the April 04, 
2005, Annual Tov/n Meeting (the FY'06 Whittier budget) by increasing the appropriation 
to meet the FY'06 assessment; said funds to be raised and appropriated and/or transferred 
from available funds; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Whittier 
R.V.T.H.S. Representative, Raymond Morley) 



28 



Whittier R.V.T.H.S. Representative Ray Morley moved that the Town vote to amend its 
action taken under Article 12 of the April 4, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'06 
Whittier budget) by increasing the appropriation from $351,000 to $400,720 to meet the 
FY'06 assessment; said appropriation to be raised by taxes. Seconded. 

Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds 
a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote (a) to appropriate the sum of 
$9,981.86 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 



Deutsch & Williams 


$1,062.97 


Labor Relations 


Ipswich Electric 


$7,246.11 


Consolidated Bldg 


Community News 


$117.00 


ZBA 


Biomarine 


$82.50 


Health 


First Southwest Co. 


$550.00 


Treasurer 


Dr. Scott Kerns 


$40.00 


Veteran's 


N.S. Medical Center 


$300.00 


Veteran's 


Dr. William Edgerton 


$15.00 


Veteran's 


Nextel 


$568.28 


Waste Water 


TOTAL: 


$9,981.86 





and (b) to meet this appropriation by appropriating $9,413 from Free Cash and by 
transferring $568.86 from the Wastewater surplus. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of: (1) the Public Safety Facilities 
Committee; (2) the Town Committee to Study the Feoffees of the Ipswich Grammar 
School; (3) the Community Development Plan Implementation Task Force; (4) the 
Recycling Committee; (5) the Municipal Parking Committee; and any other Town 
standing committees or boards as deemed necessary. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote to accept the reports of the Public 
Safety Facilities Committee; the Town Committee to Study the Feoffees of the Ipswich 
Grammar School; the Community Development Plan Implementation Task Force; the 



29 



Parking Committee and the Recycling Committee, and any other town standing 
committees or boards as deemed necessary and ask that they be continued. Seconded. 

Reports from the following committees were accepted. It was moved, seconded and 
so voted to continue the committees. 



Edward Rauscher 
Elizabeth Kilcoyne 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne 
Mark Avenmarg 
Jason Wertz 

Glenn Gibbs 
Robert Weatherall 



Public Safety Facilities Committee 
Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force 
Parking Committee 
Recycling Committee 
Ipswich Citizens Advocating 
Renewable Energy - ICARE 
Community D. P. I. Task Force 
Town Committee to Study the Feoffees 
Of the Ipswich Grammar School 



ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to authorize the following revolving fund established 
under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53EV2: A Shellfish Department 
Revolving Fund, said fund to be used for enhancements to the shellfish resources of the 
Town; (2) to determine that no more than $10,000 may be expended by the Shellfish 
Commission from monies transferred into said fund during any given fiscal year; and (3) 
to use the surcharge on commercial shellfish licenses as the source of funds. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that the Town vote to authorize for FY '06 a 
revolving fund, to be established under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53EV2; said fund to be called the Shellfish Department Revolving Fund, to be used to pay 
for enhancements to the shellfish resources of the Town; and further, that no more than 
$10,000 may be expended by the Shellfish Commission from monies transferred into said 
fund during FY'06 from a $50 surcharge on shellfish licenses. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 



Moderator James Grimes interrupted the tov/n meeting to honor retiring Town Clerk, 
Fran Richards. Richards received a plaque from the Board of Selectmen presented by 
Selectman James Foley, flowers from Representative Brad Hill and another plaque from 
the Citizens of Ipswich presented by former classmate Edward Sklarz. The trio of 
speakers honored Richards with kind words and expressions; thanking her for her 20 
years of devoted service to the Town. Richards received a standing ovation from the 
audience. 



30 



41B 


213 


41D 


032A 


41B 


171 


41D 


036 


41D 


037 


41D 


038 


41B 


212 


42A 


194 


41D 


003 



ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich 
by rezoning the following properties, as shown on the attached map, from Intown 
Residence (IR) to General Business (GB): 

Street Address Assessor's Map and Lot # 

2TopsfieldRd 41D 032 

3 Topsfield Rd 

6 Topsfield Rd 

9 Topsfield Rd 

14 Topsfield Rd 

16 Topsfield Rd 

18 Topsfield Rd 

1 Wayne St 
5 Saltonstall St 

2 Peatfield Rd 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend the Official 
Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by rezoning certain parcels along the Topsfield 
Road corridor, near the commuter rail station, as presented in Article 9 of the Warrant for 
the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting, from Intown Residence (IR) to General 
Business (GB). Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Several voters spoke in favor and against the motion. 

Carl Gardner moved to indefinitely postpone the motion. Seconded. The motion for 
indefinite postponement failed by majority voice vote. 

The voice vote on the main motion v/as inconclusive. On a hand count with 7 against and 
20 in favor, the Moderator declared the main motion passed by the required 2/3' s 
majority vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich, Section IX. Special Regulations, to add a subsection "K. Design Review," said 
subsection to read as follows: 

1 . Purpose 



31 



The purpose of this section is to preserve and enhance the Town's cultural, economic and 
historical resources by providing for a detailed review of certain changes in land use, the 
appearance of structures and the appearance of sites which may affect these resources. 

The review procedures are intended to: 

a. Enhance the social and economic viability of the Town by preserving property values 
and promoting the attractiveness of the Town as a place to live, visit and shop; 

b. Encourage the conservation of buildings and groups of buildings that have aesthetic 
or historic significance; 

c. Discourage construction that is incompatible with the existing environment; and 

d. Encourage creativity and variety in future development. 

2. Applicability and Authority 

Design Review in accordance with this section shall be required for: 

a. Any community facility, commercial, industrial or business buildings which 
require site plan review or special permit approval; 

b. New construction, exterior alteration, or expansion of buildings associated with a 
special permit application for a Great Estates Preservation Development; and 

c. Any special permit application for a multi-family dwelling or multi-family 
development. 

3. Design Review Board 

In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, a 
Design Review Board is hereby established. The Design Review Board shall review 
applications for all actions that are subject to the provisions of this section and shall make 
recommendations to the appropriate permit granting authority concerning the 
conformance of the proposed action to the design review standards contained herein. The 
Design Review Board shall consist of five members, with the following qualifications, if 
possible: two registered architects, landscape architects or persons with equivalent 
professional training; one resident who is either a business or commercial property 
owner/operator, or is a member of an organization representing Ipswich business owners; 
and one residential property owner. Appointments to the Design Review Board shall be 
made as follows: 

(1) Two members shall be appointed by the Planning Board; 

(2) One member shall be appointed by the Historical Commission; 

(3) Four members shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, two of whom shall 
be alternates. 

The terms of all members and alternate members of the Design Review Board shall be 
three years, except that when the Board is originally established, members shall be 
appointed as follows: the Planning Board shall appoint one member to a one-year term 
and one member to a two-year term; the Selectmen shall appoint one member for a two- 
year term and one member for a three-year term, and the Historical Commission shall 
appoint one member for a three-year term. The term of the alternates appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen shall be one and two years when the Board is originally established. 



32 



4. Procedures 

Applications for all actions subject to review by the Design Review Board shall be made 
by submitting a complete application form along with the required application materials 
to the Planning Department, where forms may be obtained. The application shall be 
submitted either simultaneously with, or prior to, the submittal of the associated site plan 
review or special permit application. 

a. Submittal: The applicant shall be responsible for submitting the following materials 
and documentation at the time of application: 

(1) Completed Design Review Board application; 

(2) Color photographs showing existing buildings and site conditions on and adjacent 
to the proposed project area; 

(3) Building elevations showing the proposed configuration, building materials and 
colors, and adjacent site/building conditions; 

(4) Plans showing the footprint and relationships of structures, including relationship. 
to structures on contiguous lots, exterior circulation and points of entry; 

(5) Full lot and building section, including relationship of building height and street 
width; 

(6) Other plans, including landscaping, renderings, models, and detailed drawings 
which may be necessary to demonstrate what design attributes are being 
addressed. 

Plans shall be to scale and no smaller than fifty (50) feet to the inch. The Design Review 
Board may waive any and all of the requirements for design submittal and review. 

b. Time for Review: Upon receipt of an application for design review, the Design 
Review Board shall meet with the applicant within twenty-one (21) days. The Design 
Review Board shall transmit its recommendations in writing to the applicant and the 
Planning Board within thirty- five (35) days of receipt of the application. Failure by the 
Design Review Board to make and transmit its recommendation within the thirty-five 
(35) day period allocated shall be considered a recommendation for approval of the 
application as submitted, unless the applicant was granted an extension in a public 
meeting or in writing. Applicants are strongly encouraged to request a preliminary 
consultation with the Design Review Board prior to submission of a formal application 
for design review. The purpose of a preliminary meeting is to discuss design alternatives 
during the early planning stages. Such a request may be made by submitting one or two 
preliminary design alternatives in rough sketch form to the Planning Office, which shall 
immediately transmit them to the Design Review Board. The Design Review Board shall 
meet with those requesting preliminary consultations within twenty-one (21) days of 
receipt of a written request. 

c. Exemption: No design review shall be required in those instances where the Design 
Review Board determines that specific actions subject to paragraph 2. above do not 
constitute substantial alterations to the form or appearance of a building or site, and 



33 



v/here no new or additional requirements of the Zoning Bylaw must be met for the 
proposed action. 

d. Recommendation: If the special permit granting authority elects to disregard the 
recommendation of the DRB, it shall explain its rationale for taking such action in its 
decision and/or minutes. 

5. Design Review Principles and Standards 

The design review principles and standards described in this section are intended to guide 
the applicant in the development of site and building design and the Design Review 
Board in its review of proposed actions. These principles and standards shall not be 
regarded as inflexible requirements and they are not intended to discourage creativity, 
invention or innovation. Compatibility as used below does not demand conformity or 
homogeneity. The Design Review Board is specifically precluded from mandating any 
official aesthetic style for Ipswich or for imposing the style of any particular historical 
period. The design review principles and standards shall apply to all actions reviewable 
under paragraph 2. above. 

a. Standards: When reviewing an application, the Design Review Board shall 
consider the guidance of the Town Character Statement, as well as the following 
standards: 

(1) Height - The height of any proposed alteration should be compatible with the 
style and character of the building, structure or site being altered and that of the 
surroundings. 

(2) Proportions - The proportions and relationships of height to width between 
windows, doors, signs and other architectural elements should be compatible with 
the architectural style and character of the building or structure and that of the 
surroundings. 

(3) Relation of Structures and Spaces - The relation of a structure to the open space 
between it and adjoining structures should be compatible with such relations in 
the surroundings. 

(4) Shape - The shape of roofs, windows, doors and other design elements should be 
compatible with the architectural style and character of a building or site and that 
of its surroundings. 

(5) Landscape - Any proposed landscape development or alteration should be 
compatible with the character and appearance of the surrounding area. Landscape 
and streetscape elements, including topography, plantings and paving patterns, 
should provide continuity and definition to the street, pedestrian areas and 
surrounding landscape. 

(6) Scale - The scale of a structure or landscape alteration should be compatible with 
its architectural or landscape design style and character and that of the 
surroundings. The scale of ground-level design elements such as building 
entryways, windows, porches, plaza, parks, pedestrian furniture, plantings and 
other street and site elements should be determined by and directed toward the 
use, comprehension and enjoyment of pedestrians. 



34 






(7) Directional Expression - Building facades and other architectural and landscape 
design elements should be compatible with those of others in the surrounding area 
with regard to the dominant vertical or horizontal expression or direction related 
to use and historical or cultural character, as appropriate. 

(8) Architectural and Site Details - Architectural and site details including signs, 
lighting, pedestrian furniture, planting and paving, along with materials, colors, 
textures and grade should be treated so as to be compatible with the original 
architectural and landscape design style of the structure or site and to preserve and 
enhance the character of the surrounding area. In the downtown business districts, 
these details should blend with their surroundings to create a diverse, functional 
and unified streetscape. 

(9) Signs - The design of signs should reflect the scale and character of the structure 
or site. Signs should simply and clearly identify individual establishments, 
buildings, locations and uses, while remaining subordinate to the architecture and 
larger streetscape. The choice of materials, color, size, method of illumination 
and character of symbolic representation on signs should be compatible with the 
architectural or landscape design style of the structure or site. 

(10) Garages and Accessory Buildings - Garages and accessory buildings should be 
sensitively integrated into the overall development, and should not be the 
predominant design feature when viewed from the street. 

In addition to the design review standards described above, the Design Review Board 
shall develop additional guidelines providing further detail and illustration of these 
design review standards. The guidelines, when developed, will be made available to the 
public upon request from the Planning Office. 

6. Rules and Regulations 

The Design Review Board shall promulgate and publish such Rules and Regulations as 
are deemed appropriate and consistent with the provisions of this Bylaw, or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Charles Allen moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 10 of the 
Warrant for the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Several voters spoke in favor and against the motion. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count v/ith 34 against and 109 
in favor, the motion carried by the required 2/3 's majority vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich as follows: 



35 



(1) Amend "V. USE REGULATIONS, Footnotes to Use Regulations", as follows: 

Revise footnote 9. by deleting the existing language in its entirety and substituting in lieu 
thereof the following: "9. Subject to the requirements of IX.L. of this zoning bylaw."; 

(2) Amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS" by adding a new subsection "L. Home 
Occupations", said section to read as follows: 

"L. Home Occupations 

1 . Purpose 

The conduct of home occupations may be permitted under the provisions of this section. 
It is the intent of this section to allow home occupations which are and will continue to be 
clearly incidental and secondary to the principal use of the dwelling unit or the permitted 
accessory structure. The essential component of a home occupation is that it does not 
detract from the character of the existing land use. 

2. General Standards 

Home occupations are permitted only if they conform to the following conditions: 

a. The home occupation shall be carried out only inside the building, with the exception 
of yards used in conjunction with a family day care, and except as described in 3. below. 

b. Except for a family day care, no more than twenty (20%) of the floor area of the 
residence shall be used for the purpose of the home occupation. 

c. Not more than one (1) person not a member of the household nor more than a total of 
two (2) persons shall be engaged in the home occupation, except as described in 3. below. 

d. There shall be no exterior display, no exterior storage of materials, and no other 
exterior indication of the home occupation or other variation from the residential 
character of the principal building other than an unlighted sign not to exceed two (2) 
square feet in area. 

e. No equipment or process shall be used which creates offensive noise, vibration, smoke, 
dust, odors, fumes, heat or glare detectable to the normal senses off the premises. 

f. No equipment or process shall be used which creates electrical interference in 
household devices off premises. 

g. Traffic generated shall be accommodated off street, but not more than two (2) parking 
spaces shall be located within the front yard of the property. 

h. No stock in trade shall be sold on the premises except as described in 3. below. 

36 



i. All materials and products shall be stored only within the dwelling, except as described 
in 3. below. 

j. No more than one (1) commercial vehicle and one enclosed or flat bed trailer up to 
sixteen (16) feet in length and associated with a commercial activity may be parked on 
the property. Commercial vehicles shall be limited to the following types: passenger car, 
mini van, van, sport utility vehicle (SUV), pick-up truck or other truck not to exceed 
14,000 pounds gross vehicle weight (GVW). If more than one commercial vehicle is 
parked on the property, at least one shall be parked in a garage or enclosed structure. 
Any commercial vehicle not parked in a garage shall be parked in a driveway that is at 
least five feet from any lot line and at least 15 feet from any off-premises dwelling, or 
within a screened area in a side or rear yard that effectively screens the vehicle from 
view. 

k. The use or storage of heavy equipment or vehicles (over 14,000 lbs GVW) in weight, 
or enclosed or flatbed trailers greater than sixteen (16) feet in length, is expressly 
prohibited. 

1. The principal residence of the owner/operator of every home occupation shall be the 
dwelling unit on the premises in which the home occupation operates. 

m. In no case shall the home occupation be open to the public, including clients, visitors 
and deliveries, at times earlier than 8:00 AM nor later than 8:00 PM. 

n. Home occupations should not generate significantly greater traffic volumes than would 
otherwise be expected in the particular residential area in which the home occupation is 
located. 

o. Artificial outdoor illumination of any kind is prohibited other than outdoor lighting 
appropriate for residential dwellings. 

p. A home occupation shall not allow shipments by vehicles not customarily making 
deliveries in a residential area. 

q. No highly toxic, explosive, flammable, combustible, corrosive, radioactive or similar 
hazardous materials are to be used or stored on the premises in amounts that exceed those 
that are typically found in normal residential use. 

3. Home Occupations Requiring a Special Permit 

A special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals is required for home occupations 
which: 

a. Are conducted partially or entirely within an accessory structure; 

b. Sell articles that are produced on the premises; 

c. Sell articles by catalog or internet; 

d. Employ more than one employee who is not a member of the household or more 
than a total of two (2) persons; 



37 



e. Provide dancing instruction; 

f. Are hair salons. 

The special permit shall authorize the home occupation for an initial period not exceeding 
one year. Renewal, and any subsequent renewals, of the permit may be granted by the 
special permit granting authority for a period not to exceed three (3) years, upon 
certification by the building inspector that the home occupation continues to comply with 
this section. The special permit pertains only to the specific use of the original applicant 
and does not transfer with the property. 

Any special permit issued for a home occupation pursuant to this subsection 3. shall be 
subject to the following conditions: 

i. Not more than two (2) persons not a member of the household nor more than a 
total of three (3) persons shall be engaged in the home occupation. 

ii. All materials and products shall be stored only within the dwelling and/or the 
accessory building. 

iii. For home occupations that are partially or fully contained within an accessory 
building, the occupied space in the accessory building shall not exceed six 
hundred (600) gross square feet. The total gross square footage of a home 
occupation contained within both the dwelling and the accessory building shall 
not exceed seven hundred fifty (750) gross square feet. 

4. Prohibited Occupations/ Activities 

The following occupations or activities are expressly prohibited as home occupations: 

a. servicing, maintenance, or restoration of motor vehicles 

b. trucking or warehousing activities. 

c. ongoing retail, show windows or displays. 

d. sale of articles, except as provided in 3. above. 

e. commercial stables or kennels 

f. animal hospital 

g. medical or dental clinics 
h. bakery 

i. bed and breakfast home or establishment 

j. any use or activity not listed in this subsection 4. but which the Building Inspector 
determines is inconsistent with the intent of this Section IX.L.; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsored: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Mike Ryan moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 1 1 of the Warrant for the 
October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 



38 



Under (2), make the following revisions: 

a. Revise 2. a. by deleting the word "building" and substituting in lieu thereof 
"principal dwelling"; 

b. Revise 2.c. by deleting the words "nor more than a total of two (2) persons" and 
the words, "except as described in 3. below"; 

c. Revise 2.h. by deleting the words "except as described in 3. below" and 
substituting in lieu thereof the words "unless it is produced on the premises"; 

d. Revise 2.m by adding, to the beginning of the sentence, the words "Except for a 
family day care,"; 

e. Revise "3." as follows: 

• delete the first two paragraphs in their entirety and substituting in lieu thereof 
the words "A special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals is required for 
home occupations which are conducted partially or entirely within an 
accessory building;" 

• Within the third paragraph, delete "i." in its entirety, and re-letter "ii." and 
"hi" to "i" and "ii", respectively. 



f. Revise 4. by deleting "j." in its entirety. Seconded. 

Planning Board, Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen recommended 
unanimously. 

The voice vote on the motion was inconclusive. On a hand count with 3 against and 10 
in favor, the Moderator declared the motion passed by the required 2/3 's majority vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Ipswich as follows: 

(1) Amend "I. Purpose" by adding, after the words "to encourage the most appropriate 
use of land throughout the town, the following: "as guided by the Ipswich Community 
Development Plan and the Town Character Statement;" and 

(2) Amend "III. DEFINITIONS " as follows: 

a) revise the definition of "DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY" by deleting the 
existing language in its entirety and substituting in lieu thereof the following 
language: 



39 



"DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY: A building or structure that contains two (2) 
dwelling units and either a common floor-ceiling assembly between the upper and 
lower level dwelling units or a common wall connector as defined in this Section. 

b) revise the definition of "FLOOR AREA" by deleting the words "and attics not 
designed for human occupancy" and substituting in lieu thereof the following: 
"areas under awnings or covered entry landings/decks, and attics not designed or 
used for human occupancy"; 

c) revise the definition of "MOBILE HOME" by adding, to the end of the 
definition, the following sentence: "For the purposes of this bylaw, the term 
"mobile home" shall include trailers, motorized homes and bus, camper or van 
conversions which are designed to provide human habitation."; 

d) revise the definition of "PRIVATE GUEST HOUSE" by adding, after the 
words "cooking facilities", the words "or kitchen cabinets"; 

e) Add the definition of "ACCESS", said definition to read as follows: 

"ACCESS: The actual or potential provision of vehicular entry onto a lot by 
means of its frontage on a street to a degree consistent with the use or potential 
use of the lot. For example, in the case of a residential lot, access shall mean that 
(1) there is sufficient right of vehicular passage onto the lot from the street on 
which it has frontage and (2) vehicular passage is or may be provided between the 
frontage and the dwelling unit on the lot. Nothing in this definition shall be 
construed to require actual access over the street or through the frontage if, in the 
opinion of the license or permit granting authority, alternate means of access will 
better fulfill the purposes of this bylaw. 

f) Add the definition of "COMMON WALL CONNECTOR", said definition to 

read as follows: 

"COMMON WALL CONNECTOR: An interior wall that is shared by and 
separates the two dwelling units of a two-family dwelling and meets all of the 
following requirements: 

(a) The shared length of the common wall is no less than 50% of the 
longest dimension of the rectangle in which the footprint of the larger unit 
exists. 

(b) It exists at the ground story level and is at least one (1) story in height. 

(c) It separates enclosed interior space(s) in each of the dwelling units. 

(d) It is designed to give the appearance that it connects the two dwelling 
units to each other." 

g) Add the definition of "MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT", 
said definition to read as follows: 



40 



"MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT: A lot which contains or 
has built upon it: (a) one or more multi-family dwellings; (b) one or more multi- 
family dwellings and one or more single or two-family dwellings, provided that 
the single or two-family dwellings constitute no more than 25% of the residential 
development."; and 

(3) Amend "V. USE REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a) In the Table of Use Regulations, make the following changes: 



• 



• 



after the use "Multi-family dwelling", add a new use, "Multi-family 
residential development" and assign to it the same use allowances and 
prohibitions as for "Multi-family dwelling"; 

for the use "Mobile home for temporary residency", add the footnote "1" 
to "SPB" under the columns "RRA", "RRB", and RRC"; 



b) Under "Footnotes to Use Regulations", make the following changes: 

• revise footnote "1 ." by deleting, from the first sentence, the words "with 
no renewal" and by substituting in lieu thereof "except that the Zoning 
Board of Appeals by special permit may extend period by up to one 
additional year, if it determines that special circumstances warrant such 
extension" and by adding, to the end of the third sentence of the footnote, 
the following sentence: "Travel or camping trailers or self-contained 
mobile homes may be parked on the owner's premises and be exempt 
from the provisions of this section, provided that they are not used for 
living purposes for more than two weeks in any calendar year and 
provided that mobility use is maintained and certified by valid attached 
registration plates." 

• revise footnote "18", by adding, after the words "Not more than one 
principal building per lot," the words "except as allowed in multi-family 
residential developments and"; 

(4) Amend "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a) amend "B. Table of Dimensional & Density Regulations" by amending the use 
"Multi-family" within the Intown Residence (IR), Central Business (CB), General 
Business (GB), and Highway Business (HB) Districts, by adding, after the words 
"Multi-family", the words ", Multi-family Residential Development"; 

b) amend "F." by adding, at the end of the first paragraph, the following: 

"Except for buildings and structures used for agricultural purposes as defined by 
M.G.L., C.40A, s.3, the footprint and height of accessory buildings and structures 



41 



shall not be greater than 75% of the principal structure. Accessory buildings and 
structures greater than 600 square feet in area or more than 20 feet in height, and 
located in the residential districts, shall be allowed only by special permit from 
the Zoning Board of Appeals. Accessory structures that are tent-like, made of 
canvas or similar materials, and greater than 120 square feet in area, shall be 
allowed only by special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals."; and 

(5) Amend "VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS as 
follows: 

a) Modify "B. Parking Requirements, Table of Minimum Parking 
Requirements", by 

• adding an asterisk to the column heading "Required Parking Spaces", said 
asterisk to read as follows: "**For parking associated with uses requiring 
site plan approval or special permit, the Planning Board by special permit 
may reduce the required number of parking spaces by a maximum of 
twenty-five (25%) percent, based on a determination that the specific use 
requires fewer spaces than otherwise required by the general standard." 

• Adding to the Table of Minimum Parking Requirements, as use "42.", 
under the column entitled "Commercial Uses", the following use: "Car 
wash facility", and by establishing for said use, under the column entitled 
"Required Parking Spaces", the following parking requirement: "One (1) 
space per employee on the shift of maximum employment"; and renumber 
the succeeding uses in the Table consecutively; and 

b) Modify "M. Parking and Layout, 3.," by adding, after the words "In no case 
shall," the words "surface"; and 

(6) Amend "VIII. SIGNS , D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District" as follows: 

Add a new paragraph "8.", said paragraph to read as follows: "8. Signs proposed in 
conjunction with a development requiring site plan approval or Planning Board special 
permit may, by Planning Board special permit, be increased in size from the requirements 
of this subsection D., but in no event by more than twenty- five (25%) percent."; and 

(7) Amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a) revise I.3.a.(l) as follows: 

• Amend first sentence by deleting the words "70 percent" and substituting 
in lieu thereof "60 percent"; 

• Amend the second sentence by deleting the words "60 percent" and 
substituting in lieu thereof "50 percent", and by adding, to the end of the 
sentence, the following: ", except that in no instance shall the affordable 
rent exceed 80% of the rent for the market rate units in the multi-family 



42 



residential development or the rent for comparable market rates in 
Ipswich." 

b) revise J.2. by deleting paragraph "1" in its entirety and relettering the remaining 
paragraphs accordingly; and 

(8) Amend "X. SITE PLAN REVIEW , B." as follows: 

a) modify "B. Applicability" by revising "3." by adding, after "change", the 
words "or intensification"; and 

b) modify "D. Submission Procedure", first sentence of paragraph 3., by deleting 
the words "forty-five (45) days" and substituting in lieu thereof "sixty (60) days"; 
and 

(9) Amend "XI. ADMINISTRATION , K." by adding, to the end of the second sentence 
in the second paragraph, the following: ", unless the Zoning Board of Appeals is also the 
SPGA and the special permit is not subject to Footnote 16 to the Table of Use 
Regulations."; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Planning Board) 

Planning Board member Robert Weatherall moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 12 of the 
Warrant for the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting, with the following changes: 

a. Under (2) e), revise the definition of "ACCESS" by eliminating the second 
sentence in its entirety and modifying the third sentence by replacing the words 
"license or permit granting authority" with the words "Planning Board"; 

b. Under (4) b), revise the proposed new language as follows: 

• Delete the first two sentences in their entirety and substitute in lieu thereof the 
following sentence: "Except for buildings and structures used for agricultural 
purposes as defined by M.G. L., C.40A, s.3, accessory buildings and 
structures greater than 600 square feet in area or more than 25 feet in height, 
and located on lots less then five acres in size in the residential districts, shall 
be allowed only by special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals."; 

• Amend the final sentence of the paragraph, by adding, after the v/ords 
"special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals", the words, "except for 
those structures that are for temporary purposes only"; 

c. Under (5) a), first bullet, delete the words "site plan approval or" and substitute in 
lieu thereof the word "a"; and 

d. Delete (7) a) in its entirety. Seconded. 



43 



Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the town will vote to establish an Agricultural Commission to represent the 
Ipswich farming community. Said Commission shall serve as facilitator for encouraging 
the pursuit of agriculture in Ipswich, shall promote agricultural-based economic 
opportunities in the Town, shall act as mediator, advocate, and/or educator on farming 
issues, and shall pursue all initiatives appropriate to creating a sustainable agricultural 
community in Ipswich. 

The Commission shall consist of seven members from the active farming and agriculture 
community in Ipswich, to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen - three members for a 
term of three years, two members for a term of two years, and three years thereafter; and 
two members for a one-year term, and three years thereafter. Up to five alternates may 
also be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, each for one-year terms. The appointing 
authority shall fill a vacancy based on the unexpired term of the vacancy in order to 
maintain the cycle of appointments; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Ingrid Miles moved that the Town vote to establish an Agricultural 
Commission; as presented in Article 13 of the Warrant for the October 17, 2005 Special 
Town Meeting, said Commission shall serve as facilitator and advocate for encouraging 
the pursuit of farming and agriculture in the Town of Ipswich. Seconded. \ 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Laura Russell, 
representing the farming community, spoke in favor of the commission. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of 
Ipswich by: 

1) adding "Chapter XIX. Stormwater Management", said chapter to read as follows: 

"CHAPTER XIX. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. Illicit Connections and Discharges to the Storm Drain System 
(a) Purpose 

Increased and contaminated stormwater runoff is a major cause of: 

1) impairment of water quality and flow in lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, 
wetlands and groundwater; 

2) contamination of drinking water supplies; 

3) contamination of clam flats and other coastal areas; 

4) alteration or destruction of aquatic and wildlife habitat; and 



44 



5) flooding. 
Regulation of illicit connections and discharges to the municipal storm drain 
system is necessary for the protection of the Town of Ipswich's (hereafter "the 
Town") water bodies and groundwater, and to safeguard the public health, safety, 
welfare and the environment. 

(b) The objectives of this bylaw are: 

(1) to prevent pollutants from entering the Town's municipal separate storm 
sewer system (MS4); 

(2) to prohibit illicit connections and unauthorized discharges to the MS4; 

(3) to require the removal of all such illicit connections; 

(4) to comply with state and federal statutes and regulations relating to 
stormwater discharges; 

(5) to establish the legal authority to ensure compliance with the provisions of 
this bylaw through inspection, monitoring, and enforcement; and 

(6) to prevent contamination of drinking water supplies. 

(c) Definitions 

For the purposes of this bylaw, the following shall mean: 

(1) Best Management Practice (BMP). An activity, procedure, restraint, or 
structural improvement that helps to reduce the quantity or improve the 
quality of stormwater runoff. 

(2) Clean Water Act. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. § 
1251 et seq.) as hereafter amended. 

(3) Discharge of Pollutants. The addition from any source of any pollutant or 
combination of pollutants into the municipal storm drain system or into 
the waters of the United States or Commonwealth from any source. 

(4) Groundwater. Water beneath the surface of the ground. 

(5) Illicit Connection. A surface or subsurface drain or conveyance, which 
allows an illicit discharge into the municipal storm drain system, including 
without limitation sewage, process wastewater, or wash water and any 
connections from indoor drains, sinks, or toilets, regardless of whether 
said connection was previously allowed, permitted, or approved before the 
effective date of this bylaw. 

(6) Illicit Discharge. Direct or indirect discharge to the municipal storm drain 
system that is not composed entirely of stormwater, except as exempted in 
(i) below. The term does not include a discharge in compliance with an 
NPDES Storm Water Discharge Permit or a Surface Water Discharge 
Permit, or resulting from fire fighting activities. 

(7) Impervious Surface. Any material or structure on or above the ground that 
prevents v/ater infiltrating the underlying soil. Impervious surface includes 
without limitation roads, paved parking lots, sidewalks, and rooftops. 

(8) Municipal Separate Stoim Sewer System (MS4) or Municipal Storm Drain 
System. The system of conveyances designed or used for collecting or 
conveying stormwater, including any road with a drainage system, street, 
gutter, curb, inlet, piped storm drain, pumping facility, retention or 
detention basin, natural or man-made or altered drainage channel, 



45 



reservoir, and other drainage structure that together comprise the storm 
drainage system owned or operated by the Town of Ipswich. 

(9) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water 
Discharge Permit. A permit issued by United States Environmental 
Protection Agency or jointly with the State that authorizes the discharge of 
pollutants to waters of the United States. 

(10) Non-Stormwater Discharge. Discharge to the municipal storm drain 
system not composed entirely of stormwater. 

(11) Person. An individual, partnership, association, firm, company, trust, 
corporation, agency, authority, department or political subdivision of the 
Commonwealth or the federal government, to the extent permitted by law, 
and any officer, employee, or agent of such person. 

(12) Pollutant. Any element or property of sewage, agricultural, industrial or 
commercial waste, runoff, leachate, heated effluent, or other matter 
whether originating at a point or nonpoint source, that is or may be 
introduced into any sewage treatment works or waters of the 
Commonwealth. Pollutants shall include without limitation: 

a) paints, varnishes, and solvents; 

b) oil and other automotive fluids; 

c) non-hazardous liquid and solid wastes and yard wastes; 

d) refuse, rubbish, garbage, litter, or other discarded or abandoned 
objects, ordnances, accumulations and floatables; 

e) pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers; 

f) hazardous materials and wastes; sewage, fecal coliform and 
pathogens; 

g) dissolved and particulate metals; 
h) metal objects or materials; 

i) animal wastes; 

j) rock, sand, salt, soils, or other products/material that mobilize in 

surface water runoff; 
k) construction wastes and residues; and 
1) noxious or offensive matter of any kind. 

(13) Process Wastewater. Water which, during manufacturing or processing, 
comes into direct contact with or results from the production or use of any 
material, intermediate product, finished product, or waste product. 

(14) Recharge. The process by which groundwater is replenished by 
precipitation through the percolation of runoff and surface water through 
the soil. 

(15) Stormwater. Storm water runoff, snow melt runoff, and surface water 
runoff and drainage. 

(16) Surface Water Discharge Permit. A permit issued by the Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP) pursuant to 314 CMR 3.00 that 
authorizes the discharge of pollutants to waters of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

(17) Toxic or Hazardous Material or Waste. Any material, which because of 
its quantity, concentration, chemical, corrosive, flammable, reactive, toxic, 



46 






infectious or radioactive characteristics, either separately or in 
combination with any substance or substances, constitutes a present or 
potential threat to human health, safety, welfare, or to the environment. 
Toxic or hazardous materials include, but are not limited to: 

a) any synthetic organic chemical; 

b) petroleum products; 

c) heavy metals; 

d) radioactive or infectious waste; 

e) acid and alkali substances; 

f) any substance defined as Toxic or Hazardous under G.L. Ch.21C 
and Ch.21E, and the regulations at 310 CMR 30.000 and 310 CMR 
40.0000; and 

g) any substance listed as hazardous under 40 CFR 261 . 

(18) Watercourse. A natural or man-made channel through which water flows 
or a stream of water, including a river, brook or underground stream. 

(19) Waters of the Commonwealth. All waters within the jurisdiction of the 
Commonwealth, including, without limitation, rivers, streams, lakes, 
ponds, springs, impoundments, estuaries, wetlands, costal waters, and 
groundwater. 

(20) Wastewater. Any sanitary waste, sludge, or septic tank or cesspool 
overflow, and water that during manufacturing, cleaning or processing, 
comes into direct contact with or results from the production or use of any 
raw material, intermediate product, finished product, byproduct or waste 
product. 

(d) Applicability 

This bylaw shall apply to flows entering the municipally-owned storm drainage 
system. 

(e) Authority 

This bylaw is adopted under the authority granted by the Home Rule Amendment 
of the Massachusetts Constitution and the Home Rule Procedures Act, and 
pursuant to the regulations of the federal Clean Water Act found at 40 CFR 
122.34. 

(f) Responsibility for Administration 

The Town of Ipswich Department of Public Works (DPW) shall administer, 
implement and enforce this bylaw. Any powers granted to or duties imposed upon 
the DPW may be delegated in writing by the DPW to its employees or agents. 

(g) Regulations 

The DPW may promulgate rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this 

bylaw. Failure by the DPW to promulgate such rules and regulations shall not 

have the effect of suspending or invalidating this bylaw, 
(h) Prohibited Activities 

(1) Illicit Discharges. No person shall dump, discharge, cause or allow to be 

discharged any pollutant or non-stormwater discharge into the municipal 
separate storm sewer system (MS4), into a watercourse, or into the waters 
of the Commonwealth. 



47 



(2) Illicit Connections. No person shall construct, use, allow, maintain or continue 

any illicit connection to the municipal storm drain system, regardless of 
whether the connection was permissible under applicable law, regulation 
or custom at the time of connection. 

(3) Obstruction of Municipal Storm Drain System. No person shall obstruct or 

interfere with the normal flow of stormwater into or out of the municipal 
storm drain system without prior written approval from the DPW. 
(i) Exemptions 

Any discharges associated with municipal fire fighting activities are exempt from 
the discharge prohibitions established by this bylaw. In addition, the following 
non-stormwater discharges or flows are exempt from the discharge prohibitions of 
this bylaw, provided that the source is not a significant contributor of a pollutant 
to the municipal storm drain system: 

(1) water line flushing; 

(2) flow from potable water sources; 

(3) discharge from landscape irrigation or lawn watering; 

(4) diverted stream flow; 

(5) rising groundwater; 

(6) uncontaminated groundwater infiltrating as defined in 40 CFR 
35.2005(20), or uncontaminated pumped groundwater; 

(7) water from exterior foundation drains, footing drains (not including active 
groundwater dewatering systems), crawl space pumps, or air conditioning 
condensation; 

(8) springs; 

(9) water from individual residential car washing; 

(10) natural riparian habitat or wetland flows; 

(11) discharge from dechlorinated swimming pool water (less than one ppm 
chlorine) provided the water is allowed to stand for one week prior to 
draining and the pool is drained in such a way as not to cause a nuisance; 

(12) discharge from street sweeping; 

(13) dye testing, provided verbal notification is given to the DPW prior to the 
time of the test; 

(14) nonstormwater discharge permitted under an NPDES permit, waiver, or 
waste discharge order administered under the authority of the United 
States Environmental Protection Agency, provided that the discharge is in 
full compliance with the requirements of the permit, waiver, or order and 
applicable laws and regulations; and 

(15) any discharge for which advanced written approval is received from the 
DPW as necessary to protect public health, safety, welfare, and the 
environment. 

(j) Suspension Due to Illicit Discharges in Emergency Situations 

The DPW may suspend municipal storm drain system access to any person or 
property without prior written notice when such suspension is necessary to stop an 
actual or threatened discharge of Pollutants that presents imminent risk of harm to 
the public health, safety, welfare or the environment. In the event any person fails 
to comply with an emergency suspension order, the DPW, its employees and 



48 



agents may take all reasonable steps to prevent or minimize harm to the public 
health, safety, welfare or the environment. 

(k) Suspension Due to the Detection of Illicit Discharge(s) 

Any person discharging to the MS4 in violation of this bylaw may have their MS4 
access terminated if such termination would abate or reduce an illicit discharge. 
The authorized enforcement agency will notify a violator of the proposed 
termination of its MS4 access. The violator may petition the DPW for a 
reconsideration and hearing. A person commits an offense if the person reinstates 
MS4 access to premises terminated pursuant to this Section, without the prior 
approval of the DPW. 

(1) Notification of Spills 

Notwithstanding other requirements of local, state or federal law, as soon as a 
person responsible for a facility or operation, or responsible for emergency 
response for a facility or operation has information of or suspects a release of 
materials at that facility or operation resulting in or which may result in discharge 
of pollutants to the municipal drainage system or waters of the Commonwealth, 
the person shall take all necessary steps to ensure containment and cleanup of the 
release. In the event of a release of oil or hazardous materials, the person shall 
immediately notify the municipal fire and police DPWs. In the event of a release 
of non-hazardous material, the reporting person shall notify the DPW no later 
than the next business day. The reporting person shall provide to the DPW written 
confirmation of all telephone, facsimile or in-person notifications within three 
business days thereafter. If the discharge of prohibited materials is from a 
commercial or industrial facility, the facility owner or operator of the facility shall 
retain on-site a written record of the discharge and the actions taken to prevent its 
recurrence. Such records shall be retained for at least three years. 

(m) Enforcement 

The DPW or an authorized agent shall enforce this bylaw, regulations, orders, 
violation notices, and enforcement orders, and may pursue all civil and criminal 
remedies for such violations. 

(1) Civil Relief. If a person violates the provisions of this bylaw, regulations, 
permit, notice, or order issued thereunder, the DPW may seek injunctive 
relief in a court of competent jurisdiction restraining the person from 
activities which would create further violations or compelling the person 
to perform abatement or remediation of the violation. 

(2) Orders. The DPW or an authorized agent may issue a written order to 
enforce the provisions of this bylaw or the regulations thereunder, which 
may include: 

(a) elimination of illicit connections or discharges to the MS4; 

(b) performance of monitoring, analyses, and reporting; 

(c) that unlawful discharges, practices, or operations shall cease and 
desist; and 

(d) the abatement and remediation of stormwater pollution or 
contamination hazards, and restoration of any affected property. 



49 



If the enforcing person determines that abatement or remediation of 
contamination is required and is the responsibility of the property owner 
and/or violator, the order shall set forth a deadline by which such abatement or 
remediation must be completed. Said order shall further advise that, should 
the violator or property owner fail to abate or perform remediation within the 
specified deadline, the Town may, at its option, undertake such work, and 
expenses shall be charged to the violator. 

Within thirty (30) days after completing all measures necessary to abate the 
violation or to perform remediation, the violator and the property owner will 
be notified of the costs incurred by the Town, including administrative costs. 
The violator or property owner may file a written protest objecting to the 
amount or basis of costs with the DPW within thirty (30) days of receipt of the 
notification of the costs incurred. If the amount due is not received by the 
expiration of the time in which to file a protest or within thirty (30) days 
following a decision of the DPW affirming or reducing the costs, or from a 
final decision of a court of competent jurisdiction, the costs shall become a 
special assessment against the property owner and shall constitute a lien on 
the owner's property for the amount of said costs. Interest shall begin to 
accrue on any unpaid costs at the statutory rate provided in G.L. Ch. 59, §57 
after the thirty-first day at which the costs first become due. 

(3) Criminal Penalty. Any person who violates any provision of this bylaw, 
regulation, order, or permit issued thereunder, shall be punished by a fine 
of not more than $200. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs 
or continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

(4) Non-Criminal Disposition. As an alternative to criminal prosecution or 
civil action, the Town may elect to utilize the non-criminal disposition 
procedure set forth in G.L. Ch. 40, §2 ID and Ch. 17, §4, Subsection B of 
the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich. The penalty for the 1st 
violation shall be $50. The penalty for the 2nd violation shall be $100. The 
penalty for the 3rd and subsequent violations shall be $200. Each day or 
part thereof that such violation occurs or continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

(5) Entry to Perform Duties Under this Bylaw. To the extent permitted by 
state law, or if authorized by the owner or the other party in control of the 
project, the DPW, its agents, officers, and employees may enter upon 
privately owned property for the purpose of performing their duties under 
this bylaw and regulations and may make or cause to be made such 
examinations, surveys or sampling as the DPW deems reasonably 
necessary. 

(6) Appeals. The decisions or orders of the DPW shall be final. Further relief 
shall be to a court of competent jurisdiction. 

(7) Remedies Not Exclusive. The remedies listed in this bylaw are not 
exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable federal, 
state or local law. 

(n) Severability 



50 



The provisions of this bylaw are hereby declared to be severable. If any provision, 
paragraph, sentence, or clause, of this bylaw or the application thereof to any 
person, establishment, or circumstances shall be held invalid, such invalidity shall 
not affect the other provisions or application of this bylaw, 
(o) Transitional Provisions 

Residential property owners shall have six months from the effective date of the 
bylaw to comply with its provisions, provided good cause is shown for the failure 
to comply v/ith the bylaw during that period."; and 

2. amending "CHAPTER XVII. Section 4., Subsection B." by adding, to the end of the 
subsection, the following: 

"Chapter XIX. Stormwater Management (Department of Public Works) 

1 . Illicit Connections and Discharges to the Storm Drain System 

a. First offense 50.00 

b. Second offense 100.00 

c. Third and subsequent offense 200.00"; 

or to take any other action relevant thereto. (Sponsor: Department of Public Works) 

Selectman James Foley moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE! 5 

To see if the Town will vote to establish under Chapter 40, Section 5B of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, a Capital Improvements Stabilization Fund, for the purpose 
of accepting funds from a variety of sources to be used exclusively for annual capital 
expenditures by town departments; or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that the Town vote under Chapter 40, Section 5B, 
of the Massachusetts General Laws to create special stabilization funds to accumulate 
monies for town wide capital improvements as presented in Article 15 of the Warrant for 
the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. 

Edward Sklarz moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 

The voice vote on the motion to indefinitely postpone action on this article was 
inconclusive. On a hand count with 48 in favor and 37 against, the motion carried to 
indefinitely postpone action on this article. 



51 



ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey a portion of 
land near the former town hall structure located on Elm Street and South Main Street, 
shown as Parcel 1 13 on Ipswich Assessors' Map 42 A, in exchange for a portion of the 
land shown as Parcel 1 12 on Ipswich Assessors' Map 42A of equal value and similar 
size and for no monetary consideration, and on such other terms and conditions as the 
Board of Selectmen shall determine are acceptable or to take any other action relative 
thereto. The amount of land to be exchanged shall not exceed 1,600 square feet in size. A 
copy of a draft proposed plan showing the approximate area of land to be exchanged is on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and in the office of the Planning Board. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey a portion of land near the former Town Hall structure located on 
Elm and South Main Streets, shown as Parcel 1 13 on Ipswich Assessors' Map 42A, in 
exchange for a portion of the land shown as Parcel 1 12 on Ipswich Assessors' Map 42 A, 
of equal value and similar size and for no monetary consideration, as presented in Article 
16 of the Warrant for the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, or 
otherwise, and to accept the deed to the Town of a fee simple interest in the real property 
located at 19 New Mill Place, Unit 12, Ipswich, upon such terms and conditions as the 
Board of Selectmen shall determine to be appropriate, to be under the care, custody and 
control of the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of sale, and further to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to sell said property upon such terms and conditions as the Board of 
Selectmen shall determine to be appropriate for a minimum purchase price to be 
determined by the Board of Selectmen; and, further to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow a sum of money for the purposes 
of this article and authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town officers to take all related 
actions necessary or appropriate to carry out this acquisition and subsequent disposition, 
including the submission, on behalf of the town, of any and all applications deemed 
necessary for grants and/or reimbursements from any state or federal programs and to 
receive and accept such grants or reimbursements for this purpose, and/or any other 
purposes in any way connected with the scope of this Article, or to take any action related 
thereto. (Sponsor: Ipswich Housing Partnership) 

Selectman Elizabeth Kilcoyne moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. 



52 



Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote to indefinitely postpone action on this article. 






ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant a nonexclusive 
easement to Alice Homans, Trustee of The Alice G. Homans Trust, owner of 6 Warren 
Street in, along, upon and under a portion of the land owned by the Town, known as 
"Warren Street", as laid out by the Board of Selectmen on March 27, 1886, the name of 
which was accepted by the March 26, 1900 Annual Town Meeting, and described 
generally on the sketch entitled "Mortgage Inspection Plan Located in Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, Deed Book 15088, Plan 405", dated July 25, 2005, prepared by Bradford 
Engineering Company, and on file with the Town Clerk, for the purposes of accessing, 
maintaining, repairing, replacing and using the existing stairs located on Warren Street, 
for no monetary consideration, upon such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen 
shall determine to be appropriate, or to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: 
Board of Selectmen) 

Selectman Edward Rauscher moved that the Town vote authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to grant a nonexclusive easement to Alice Homans, Trustee of The Alice G. Homans 
Trust, and owner of 6 Warren Street, for the purposes of repairing, replacing and using 
the existing stairs located on Warren Street; as presented in Article 1 8 of the Warrant for 
the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting; and further that there be a one dollar 
($1.00) monetary consideration for this easement. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the release of abandonment of any right, title or 
interest held by the Town in and to the paper street named Dardanelles Road, as shown 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Subdivision Of Land Of The Proprietors Of Great Neck, Inc. 
To Be Known As Stage Hill Subdivision, Ipswich Mass., Scale 1" = 80', dated January, 
1947 by Chester J. Patch, Jr., Civil Engineer, recorded v/ith the Essex County South 
District Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 96, Plan 73 (copy attached). The portion of said 
plan showing said paper street was rescinded by vote of the Ipswich Planning Board 
dated March 3, 1981 as reflected by Certificate of Vote recorded with said Deeds at Book 
6803, Page 467 (copy attached). (Submitted by Petition). 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to approve a petition requesting 
release or abandonment of any right, title or interest held by the Town in and to the paper 



53 



street named Dardanelles Road on Great Neck, as presented in Article 19 of the Warrant 
for the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting. Seconded. 

Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried 
by unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles raising and/or 
appropriating money which have a direct impact on the levy for the next ensuing fiscal 
year, as contained in this warrant, for the purpose of completing a budget which is 
balanced and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2!/2, so called; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (Sponsor: Board of Selectmen) 

Town Clerk Fran Richards moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Seconded. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. 

In her final official role, retiring Town Clerk Fran Richards moved to adjourn the Special 
Town Meeting which was seconded and so voted. The meeting adjourned at 1 1 :01 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting attested copies thereof at the Post 
Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by publication at least seven days 
prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, or having a 
general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-sixth day of September in the year of our Lord, Two 
Thousand and Five. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James W. Foley 
Patrick J. McNally 
Edward B. Rauscher 
Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 
Ingrid F. Miles 



54 



******** 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James W. Foley, Chairman 

The year 2005 was a year of great change and excitement for 
Ipswich Municipal Government. In February, the Town 
welcomed Norfolk Town Manager Robert T. Markel as the new 
Ipswich town manager replacing long time Town Manager 
George E. Howe. The Board has spent a great deal of time 
and effort assisting with the transition of leadership to 
ensure a working and smooth operation. The Board of 
Selectmen wishes both Mr. Howe and Mr. Markel success and 
happiness in their respective challenges. 

Like all other municipal governments, Ipswich continues to 
struggle with the Proposition 2-1/2 tax limit. Town 
services that provide basic community needs were met; but 
new programs and initiatives were not funded. The Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee sponsored a joint Prop. 
2-1/2 override in April for a variety of services, but it 
was defeated at the ballot. Road and street paving 
projects along with the replacement of DPW equipment were 
not funded due to the override defeat. The Board 
concentrated on goal setting and budget priority for 
capital items for FY2007 to begin to address the Town' s 
infrastructure and capital needs that will require 
substantial investment. Fixed cost items such as health 
insurance, property and casualty insurance, contractual 
obligations for collective bargaining, and the high cost of 
fuel has played a major role in determining budget 
priorities in FY2006. 

The Board has been active in a number of new areas this 
year involving a wide variety of new subcommittees dealing 
with important issues like municipal parking, solid waste 
and recycling, athletic playing fields, and Public Safety 
notification and preparedness. The Town will observe the 
benefit from both a financial and operational standpoint in 
the coming years due to the hard work of these dedicated 
residents and staff members. 

The Selectmen and the Public Safety Facility Study 
Committee continue to meet in regards to updating the 
Central Fire Station. Site locations, combined Public 
Safety building concepts, and renovation and upgrade of our 
present site are all being discussed. The present 



55 



structure, constructed during the early 1900' s, must be 
either relocated or changed to accommodate the present 
Public Safety program for the Town. 

In the fall of this year, the Town was dealt two emergency 
situations that tested all sections of the local government 
and public schools. First, the State Department of Public 
Health notified the Town of positive test results in 
mosquitoes for Eastern Equine Encephalitis. State, County 
and Local officials worked together to address this "new to 
Ipswich" public health issue. While attempting to review 
and make recommendations to our first emergency, the second 
test came with a public water supply emergency. The 
malfunction of a pumping unit at the Water Filtration Plant 
sent a large volume of a water treatment chemical into the 
Town' s distribution system causing the State Department of 
Environmental Protection to "shut down" the Ipswich system 
for an extended period of time. Again State and Local 
Officials worked side by side to bring the system back on 
line in a timely and efficient manner. Many operations and 
procedures were examined due to both situations, and 
advisements and recommendations will be forthcoming. The 
Town staff responded with a high degree of professionalism 
and knowledge to both incidents. 

In the area of Public Utilities, the Board acting as Water, 
Wastewater and Electric Commissioners, have been dealing 
with the continuation or decommissioning of the Municipal 
Power Plant that has served Ipswich for over a century. 
The cost of in-house general, standby status, long term 
power contracts, and "spot market" purchases all play 
important roles in determining the future of this vital 
utility. The updating of equipment at both the Water 
Filtration and Wastewater Treatment Plants has been 
addressed this year, along with some repairs to the 
distribution system. Commissioners realize the high cost 
of utility bills that users carry and are making every 
effort to address their concerns with careful and strategic 
planning . 

The Board of Selectmen v/as please v/ith the establishment of 
an Agricultural Commission, Design Review Board, and 
Shellfish Department revolving fund that all were created 
at the Annual Town Meeting. 

Large scale projects that continue to be present but need 
to be addressed are in the works. The creation of a GIS 



56 



Division, establishment of an illicit discharge by-law, 
creation of a Central Fleet Maintenance Department, and 
regional sharing of services must be addressed during the 
upcoming budget review process. The concept of fund 
reserves for emergency demands has long been in place, but 
the method of funding these accounts must be addressed for 
continuation of a strong municipal foundation. Local 
government must constantly adjust itself to a continually 
changing set of circumstances; and the struggle to do so 
takes its financial resources. 

I wish to express my deep appreciation to all departments, 
boards and commissions for their cooperation and dedication 
to the Town and its citizens. 

TOWN MANAGER 

Robert T. Markel 

The over-arching issue in Town government during 2005 was 
the recognition of the need for more investment in the 
Town's infrastructure. In recent years, revenues have been 
adequate to support the operating budgets of town 
departments but insufficient to support capital investment 
needs. The focus of Town leaders in 2005 has been on 
reviewing municipal services and re-setting priorities so 
that the Town can invest in its infrastructure needs. 

The defeat of a proposed general override of the 
Proposition 2-H tax cap in April caused postponement of the 
purchase of a new snowplow and cancellation of the street 
resurfacing program for 2005. Work that was scheduled for 
the summer of 2005 was shifted forward to 2006. 
Nevertheless, recognition by the Town's leadership that 
streets and sidewalks are in dire need of improvement has 
conditioned the budget process, and spending priorities 
have been set to fund an extensive program of street 
improvements during the 2006 construction season. 

There was heightened concern for the recycling of solid 
waste during 2005. The cost of trash collection, now 
approaching $1 million annually, is growing faster than any 
other municipal service. Recycling trash is far less 
costly than hauling it to an incinerator and paying a 
"tipping fee," and so the Department of Public Works and a 
citizen-based Recycling Committee have joined together to 



57 



promote awareness and increase the percentage of the town' s 
solid waste that is recycled. 

Fixed costs continue to be problematic for the town. 
Health insurance, building and liability insurance and 
energy costs have been increasing at double-digit levels in 
recent years. Re-bidding the building and liability 
insurance contract resulted in a $176,000 savings in 2005, 
but health insurance rose by 14.5%, and energy costs for 
vehicles and public buildings have risen dramatically. 
There is now a plan in place for conserving energy through 
upgrades to public buildings and future purchases of fuel- 
efficient vehicles. In addition, the town manager has 
worked with employees through the Insurance Advisory 
Committee to implement changes that will moderate future 
increases in premiums for health insurance.- 

Among the issues that will involve the Town Manager and the 
Selectmen in 2006 are the growing problem of beaver dams, 
lime disease caused by the deer tick, and control of the 
mosquito population. In 2005, mosquitoes carrying Eastern 
Equine Encephalitis were discovered for the first time ever 
within the Town limits. 

The Town has made significant strides in upgrading and 
using technology during 2005. A "second generation" 
website has been created whereby town business transactions 
can done online. Residents can now pay property taxes and 
auto excise tax over the website, and they can apply for 
beach stickers. In the coming year, there will be 
continuing emphasis on enabling citizens to do of their 
normal business transactions with Tov/n government online. 

The condition of the Central Fire Station is a major, 
unresolved issue for the Town. The station is nearly a 
century old, has significant structural problems and does 
not have the capacity for modern fire apparatus. The 
Public Safety Facilities Committee has worked throughout 
2005 to evaluate alternative sites for a new Fire 
Headquarters versus a renovation and upgrade of the 
existing facility. The Committee has decided to support 
renovation and expansion of the existing facility and will 
present a proposal to Town Meeting in the near future. 

Lastly, with regard to personnel, Town Clerk Fran Richards 
retired after 21 years with the Town and 16 years as Clerk. 
Pamela Carakatsane, former Town Clerk in Lynnfield, was 



58 






appointed to the Ipswich position in November. Lee Graves, 
former Assistant Town Clerk transferred to the Police 
Department in September, and Kathy Marini was appointed as 
her replacement. Kathy was upgraded to Assistant Town 
Clerk by Fran Richards in one of her last official acts. 

Susan Lemieux retired as Assistant Treasurer/Collector 
after 18 years of service to the Town. Donald Carter was 
appointed Assistant Treasurer/Collector in June. Patrolmen 
Edward Walsh, Theodore LeMieux and William Morrison retired 
during 2005. Firefighter Bruce Linehan retired from the 
Fire Department, and Assistant Shellfish Constables Robert 
Kneeland and Evan Parker have retired. 

David Koonce was appointed as Open Space Program Manager in 
May, succeeding Tracy Hines. Matt Antczak was appointed 
Assistant Animal Control Officer in May and was appointed 
Acting Animal Control Officer and Inspector of Animals on 
October 1. Francis Doyle was appointed Recording Secretary 
to the Conservation Commission in February; Cori Thurlow 
was appointed Collection Clerk in the Treasurer/Collectors 
Office; and Jennifer Guarino became a Secretary in the 
Health Department. 

• *•*•**■*•*• 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Charles D. Surpitski, Director 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Chief of Police: Charles D. Surpitski 
Deputy Chief: Peter A. Foote 

The Police Department saw many personnel changes in 2005. 
Longtime patrol officers Edward Walsh, Theodore LeMieux, 
and William Morrison retired. Deputy Chief Peter A. Foote 
announced late in 2005 that he would retire in early 2006. 
The Town has been well served by these officers and their 
presence will be missed. 

Thanks in large part to the commitment of our officers and 
a concerned and involved citizenry, the Town continued to 
be a safe place to live. The department continued to 
heavily invest in the training of our officers to meet new 
crime trends, improve investigative techniques, and/or deal 
more effectively with our fellow residents. 



59 



The department continued to work closely with other town 
departments, regional organizations, our neighboring 
communities, and state agencies. We improved our ability to 
directly communicate with all other agencies who we may 
require assistance from in times of natural or man-made 
disaster. As recent events have taught us, this capability 
is essential in mitigating the effects of such events. We 
are proud to report that prior to such events as 9/11 or 
the devastating effects of hurricanes - this multi-year 
plan to improve our communications capability with other 
agencies and our citizens was well underway. Other 
significant improvements will occur during 2006. 

The police log during 2005 reflected 10,300 recorded 
entries. There were 1,896 calls to our 911 system. It 
should be noted that these numbers do not reflect other 
citizen/police or citizen/communication center interaction. 
These numbers are significant. 

Below are some of the incidents with which the police 
dealt : 



Accidents - 302 
Assaults - 34 
Citations - 378 
Larceny - 99 
ID theft - 14 
Alarms - 774 
Disturbances - 213 
Missing - 17 
Threats - 33 
Parking Tickets - 316 
Summons adult - 111 
Summons juvenile - 29 



Arrests adult - 137 
Arrests juvenile - 13 
B & E - 46 
Domestic - 121 
Fraud/theft - 29 
PC -- 8 
Animals - 233 
Medicals - 705 
Annoying phone calls 



84 



■kicir^cic^cicir-k 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Willard Maker 
Acting Fire Chief 

The department received a State fire equipment grant for $21,000. We 
purchased breathing apparatus bottles and voice amplifiers, a dryer 
for firefighting suits, hose, water rescue dry suits, and a laptop 
computer. A Rural Fire grant for $2,850 purchased new forest fire 
fighting equipment. We have also received a Federal grant of 
$128,250 to purchase a new forest fire truck, which will arrive in 



60 



2006. These grants were obtained through the efforts of Lieutenant 
Andy Theriault. The funds help to lessen the financial burden on our 
community. 




Jeff Stone, Jeff French and Rick Smith admiring 
the Red Sox World Series Trophy when it came to Ipswich 

In the S.A.F.E. program, firefighters instructed all children in 
kindergarten through 5 th grades in fire safety. Through the car seat 
safety program, firefighter Rick Smith assisted many families by 
installing child safety seats. 

Firefighter Tom Rice was hired as the department's newest career 
firefighter. Firefighters received over one thousand hours of 
training, including the new National Incident Management System 
(NIMS) for Homeland Security. 

The department is involved in the effort to improve or replace the 
Central Firehouse which is approaching 100 years .old, and desperately 
in need of replacement . 

Calls for service during 2005 were: 

Fires involving structures: 21 

Other fires: 45 

Medical or Rescue calls: 609 

Motor Vehicle Accidents: 96 

Hazards: 128 

Alarms: 293 

Out of Town Responses: 33 

Other Service: 473 

Total calls for service: 1685 

Fire Prevention activities: 805 



61 



Incidents are divided into six districts. In 2005, they were spread 

as follows; 

In-town: 538 County Rd: 432 

High St: 172 Linebrook Rd: 174 

Topsfield Rd: 136 Neck: 112 

•k-k-k-k-k-kk-k 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry Leno, Animal Control Officer 

Matt Antczak, Assistant Animal Control Officer 

The year 2005 brought Ipswich residents the full awareness 
of West Nile, Coyotes, Fischer Cats; and that, yes, our 
animals can also get Lyme disease. This is why this 
department highly recommends keeping pets indoors as much 
as possible. 

This department needs to acknowledge the outstanding 
support of our Ipswich Humane Group for their determination 
in keeping our community' s strays sheltered, fed, and in 
finding them new loving homes. They are my backbone and 
support, and I thank them all. 

The department continues to work with the local and state 
health agencies in educating the townspeople of Ipswich on 
any further health concerns involving the spread of 
diseases to humans, domestic pets, livestock and wildlife. 

This department is seeking to be involved with other 
communities in our area to create an emergency plan to 
protect our animals if we should ever have our own Katrina- 
type disaster. 

The department continues to strive in educating the public 
on the importance of high quality pet care which will 
improve the quality of pet and community life in the 
future . 

The department continues to enforce all animal issues, 
regulations and bylaws that regulate the safety of our 
domestic animals. This will lend itself to improved pet 
safety and quality of our neighborhood life. So please 
remember to license your dogs, walk them with a leash, 
clean up the fowling afterwards. If the dogs are barking a 
lot, bring them indoors. 



62 



Below are some of the incidents that the department dealt 
with during 2005: 

Animals adopted: 

Dogs 4 

Cats 65 

Kittens 28 

Animals killed by motor vehicles 206 

Citations issued 171 

Complaints received 4,560 

Complaints investigated 4,280 

Dog licenses issued 1,932 

Multi licenses issued 75 

Dogs picked up 92 

Animals found 217 

Quarantine orders 97 

Barn inspections 84 

• •*•■*■•*■-*••*■■*••*• 

HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

Charles B. Schwartz, Assistant Harbormaster 

Boating activity was back to normal this year. It was a 
very good boating season. There were no major incidents on 
our waterways during the 2005 boating season. Boater 
education, responsible boaters, continued staggered patrols 
by the patrol boat and our personal watercraft heavily 
contributed to this accomplishment. 

A new Kawasaki personal watercraft was purchased this 
season. 

The pumpout boat, completing its sixth season, continues to 
help keep our waterways clean and pollution free. Working 
in conjunction with the Tov/n of Rowley, there is seven day 
a week coverage. This service is free to boaters. A nev; 
operator was hired this year. Our boat pumped 5,090 gallons 
of effluent this season. 

Medical emergencies, boat groundings, and breakdowns 
continue to occur; but v/ith our ability to respond rapidly 
with our patrol boat, the personal watercraft, and with the 
assistance of the Fire Department and Crane Beach 
personnel, we have been able to keep major incidents to a 
minimum. 



63 



The Harbors Department is grateful to the Waterways 
Advisory Committee for its untiring efforts, counsel and 
support in the never-ending myriad of issues that is the 
Harbors Department. Much time was spent again this year 
trying to get our river dredged. 

We issued 664 mooring permits, 385 daily and 164 seasonal 
launch stickers, and 50% of boating excise taxes 
contributed $68,809 to the Town's income. 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Shellfish Constable: Phillip Kent 

Shellfishing improved in 2005 when compared to 2004. There 
is evidence that, due to good seeding of clams over the 
last two years, 2006 will be better still. 



is«2* 



Constable Phil Kent speaking with clammers at 
Jennings Flat off of Argilla Road 

During 2005, there v/ere approximately 10,976 bushels of 
clams harvested from our area. Unfortunately, all the flats 
were closed from May 20 through July 20 due to "red" tide. 
Other closures of the clamming flats following rain 
continued to have a significant impact on the number of 
days/tides harvesting could occur. 

Longtime Deputy Constable Robert Kneeland retired as did 
Deputy Constable Evan Parker. Their contribution to the 



64 



health and regulation of our waterways resources will be 
missed. The Department is fortunate to have appointed 
Brenda Turner and Scott LaPreste to replace them. 

The Shellfish Department continued its efforts to enforce 
and protect the resources during 2005. As in past years, 
personnel worked closely with the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries, other area 
Shellfish Constables, and Town departments in monitoring 
water quality essential to a healthy shellfish product and 
to ensure the safety and proper harvesting of this most 
precious resource. 

The Town Clerk issued 106 commercial shellfishing licenses, 
15 free commercial licenses to residents over 70 years of 
age, 74 residential recreational licenses, 118 family 
recreational licenses, and 83 non-resident recreational 
licenses . 



■*•-*•****** 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Charles H. Cooper- Director 

This year I took several emergency management courses and 
training sessions, and I attended meetings at the Region 1 
Headquarters in Tewksbury and the Local Emergency Planning 
Council meetings. In December, I attended the 2005 Homeland 
Security Domestic Preparedness Conference and joined the 
Massachusetts Association of Emergency Management 
Professionals . 

On April 2 nd we offered an emergency communications 
workshop. We co-sponsored this training with the American 
Radio Relay League- Eastern Massachusetts Amateur Radio 
Emergency Services (ARES) . Approximately 40 amateur radio 
operators attended this workshop. The Middlesex County 
Sheriffs provided their Mobile Command Post for use for the 
workshop. I was pleased and surprised to be presented that 
day with an "Emergency Communications Commendation" from 
the ARRL for "extraordinary performance and integration of 
ARES into public safety operations". 

Using the weather station located at the Police Station, we 
continued to support the National Weather Service Skywarn 
program and provided severe weather observations to the NWS 
Office via amateur radio or telephone. 



65 



Each month we participated in the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency radio nets. On the same night that these 
nets are held, we conduct our own local net on our two 
meter repeater, which is open to all licensed amateur radio 
operators. Our two meter repeater was also used each week 
by the USCG Auxiliary for their Division radio net. 

We currently have a robust and flexible communications 
system for use in the event of a disaster. This radio 
equipment allows us to communicate with local, state and 
federal agencies using a variety of modes and frequencies. 

Through a grant this year, we obtained three 5, 800 watt 
gasoline generators, a 6, 000 watt diesel generator/light 
unit, and three portable shelters. 

Incident Command System Training is currently underway for 
all first responders. Mandated by the federal government, 
this training will ensure that all responders are 
functioning under the same system in the event of a 
disaster. By September 2006, all first responders must 
complete the initial training. We anticipate that Ipswich 
will be fully compliant by that date. 

******** 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE - Robert C. Gravino, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Robert C. Gravino, Director 

The Public Works Department is a customer focused service 
organization, dedicated to maintaining and improving the 
town's infrastructure through the efforts of a professional 
work force. With that as our mission, DPW incorporates an 
on-going review of what we do and how we do it, with the 
intent of delivering high quality service to our customers 
and enhancing the quality of life in our diverse community. 
Customer focus, continuous process improvement, human 
resource development, and resource management are the keys 
to our success. 

Public Works accomplished or is working on the following 

items in support of our mission: 

• Provide technical input to Town boards and commissions 
on special permits, subdivisions, site plan reviews, 
and commercial and residential development that impact 



66 



on Public Works' Operations and Maintenance (O&M) 
responsibilities and budget. 

Implemented Year 2 of the Storm Water Management Plan 
to comply with the Phase II Storm Water Rule 
Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act. 
Incorporate an Infrastructure Asset Management Program 
into the Town's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 
mapping and databases, specifically for roadway and 
drainage infrastructure management. 

Developed and implemented Operation and Maintenance 
plans for existing water quality structures installed 
for storm water management. 

Provide technical assistance to homeowners to correct 
illegal discharges of water from their property into a 
public way. 

Implemented a permitting system for overnight parking 
of vehicles in municipal parking lots. 

Use the DPW Pavement Management Plan to identify and 
schedule those roads most in need of roadway 
improvement and maintenance. 

Complete engineering design and commission approvals 
for the Mill Road Bridge repairs and the Green Street 
Stormwater Project. 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

In the warmer months, the focus is on outdoor construction 
projects, where personnel skills and heavy equipment 
produce significant infrastructure repairs and improvements 
to roads, sidewalks, public facilities, and catch basins. 
A work order system assists in prioritizing and scheduling 
assignments when weather or personnel availability 
precludes accomplishment of major jobs. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

Forestry budget is partially funded by the Utilities 
Department for line clearing done for the Electric 
Division. A significant percentage of the line clearing 
occurred on Linebrook Road, Argilla Road, and High Street. 



67 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Closer inspection and additional preventive maintenance of 
vehicles has helped extend the service life and reduce the 
maintenance costs of the DPW fleet. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station accepts yard waste only, specifically 
grass clippings, leaves, brush, and small branches, and is 
open Wednesdays and Saturdays, 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM. 
White goods, electrical appliances, and TV's and computer 
monitors are disposed of curbside by the Town's trash 
contractor through the purchase of a $25 sticker, available 
at the Public Works office in Town Hall. The Transfer 
Station is operated by a member of the Highway Division. 

The DPW special collections are conducted twice yearly at 
the Transfer Station. They accept oil based paints and 
related products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, and 
tires. The fall collection is held in conjunction with the 
Health Department's Household Hazardous Waste Collection 
Day to better serve residents. 

SANITATION 

DPW educates residents that each pound of recyclable 
material that is diverted from the trash stream is a 
reduction in our costs, since the Town is charged a fixed 
fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping fee for every 
pound of trash. The total tonnage of solid waste picked up 
in calendar year 2005 (5,121 tons) increased by 100 tons 
over that collected in 2004 (5,021 tons), an increase of 
2%. 

SNOW AND ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2004/2005 was a challenge for the Town 
employees and contractors who worked to keep the roads and 
public sidewalks safe and passable. The cost for snow and 
ice operations exceeded the budgeted amount by $277,500. 

Access to homes by emergency response vehicles is the first 
priority for Town crews during snow and ice operations. 
Sidewalks in close proximity to schools are also a high 
priority for snow removal, due to the reduction in students 
being transported by the Town' s bus contractor and the 
resultant increase in students walking to school. 



68 




Ed Ogiba from the Forestry Department is plowing the sidewalks 

downtown . 



•*■* + + *•*•■*•* 



PLANT & FACILITIES OPERATION 

Joseph Lucido, Director of Plant and Facilities 

Currently in its fifth year, the department has once again 
participated in some major projects as well as the day-to- 
day operations of Government and School. We have 
decommissioned the former Town Hall, preparing it for its 
new owner. With the closing of one chapter, we opened 
another and have completed the rejuvenation of the New Town 
Hall Gateway. We have removed the old crumbled concrete 
stairs and installed brand new, New England Granite stairs. 
We will be completing phase two of this project by 
repairing the four columns at the main entrance, and 
continuing the patio resurfacing and bronze railings. We 
have also turned over the keys to the old Annex building on 
Green Street to the North Shore Housing Trust who will be 
renovating and turning this into affordable housing units. 

On the other side of the coin we have continued the window 
replacement project at the Do yon School. Along with that we 
have done some modifications to the student drop off at 
Winthrop school, providing a new lane for bus traffic. We 
also continue to work at the Middle/High School on daily 
maintenance issues. 

Late in 2005, the Board of Selectmen, School Committee, and 
Finance Committee have formed a study group to discuss the 



69 



future focus of Plant & Facilities. This group will be 
looking for answers as to how we are staffed (the 
school/town split) , what type of services are we looking 
for, etc. This is the first time the Department has seen 
this type of attention since it was formed in 2001. They 
are hoping to have a plan in place by the • summer of 2006, 
and will continue to watch the department evolve. 

We will continue to provide the essential services needed 
to maintain and preserve the infrastructure of our Town 
buildings and facilities, as well as continue to look at 
long-range capital improvements. 

******** 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James Graffum, Superintendent 

We are responsible for the care and maintenance of nine 
cemeteries and 7 parks, plus all Town commons, the Ipswich 
resident side of Crane Beach and boardwalk, and Pavilion 
Beach. In addition, we maintain all Town-owned open space,. 
Strawberry Hill (Wendel Estate) , and the newly-acquired 
property "Dow Brook Conservation Area" located on High 
Street near the Ipswich-Rowley town line. \ 

New chain link fencing was recently installed along the 
road at the Great Neck Playground. As winter weather 
permits, Bakers Pond and the Bialek Park rink area are 
plowed off to accommodate skaters. 

The staff also provides assistance to the Public Works 
Department in snow removal operations and sanding, plus any 
emergency situation as needed. 

We also aid the Town Clerk in setting up voting equipment 
at the polls, and tables, etc., for the semi-annual Town 
Meeting. 

There were one hundred and three interments in 2005. 



Revenue 

Chapel Tent: $1,500.00 

Foundations: 3,2 60.00 

Openings: 39,300.00 



70 



Perpetual Care: 
Sale of Lots: 
Total 



12,250.00 

1,4700.00 

$71,010.00 

■k-k'k'kk-k-k'k 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - James A. Sperber, Director 



JANUARY 1, 2005 TO DECEMBER 31, 2005 



Category/ 
Construction 


#0f 

Permits 


ota! 
Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


37 


$23,220. 


00 


$3, 199, 650. 


00 


Attached Accessory 


1 


$515. 


00 


$70, 000. 


00 


Certificate of 
Occupancy 


64 


$1, 525. 


00 


N/A 


Commercial - New 


5 


$24,390. 


00 


$3, 825,000. 


00 


Commercial - Alter. 


6 


$10,175. 


00 


$1, 657,087. 


00 


Decks & Porches 


44 


$3,704. 


50 


$394,041. 


00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


9 


$17,719. 


00 


$1, 590,400. 


00 


Demolition 


8 


$325. 


00 


$32, 000. 


00 


Detached Accessory 


53 


$6, 568. 


50 


$700,301. 


00 


Fence 


11 


$525. 


00 


$37,768. 


00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 





$0. 


00 


$0. 


00 


Miscellaneous 


12 


$1, 936 


00 


$241, 550. 


00 


Remodel /Alter at ion 


168 


$46, 595 


40 


$6,360,430 


00 


Repair 


29 


$2, 011 


.50 


$260,445 


00 


Roofs, Siding, 
Windows 


237 


$22,793 


.63 


$2,793, 041 


.28 


Single Family 
Attached 


36 


$48,832 


.86 


$6,954,571 


.00 


Single Family 
Dwelling 


21 


$47,212 


.01 


$6,559,529 


.00 


Sign 


31 


$1,420 


.00 


$34,140 


.00 


Stove 


27 


$1, 460 


.00 


$62, 856 


.00 


Swimming Pools 


8 


$1,296 


.80 


$159,195 


.00 


Tents 


26 


$25 


.00 


$67, 148 


.00 


Totals 


833 


$262,250 


.20 


$34, 999,152 


.28 


Plumbing Tot 


:a! Fees 


Gas 




Total Fees 




331 $27 


,940.00 


195 




$13,940.00 





71 



** As in prior years, fees for plumbing and gas permits are 

split 

50%/50% for the salary of Plumbing/Gas Inspector Robert 

Hyde and the Town of Ipswich. 

Please remember that building permits are required for not 
only new construction, but for repairs and replacement of 
existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. 
If you have any question about whether your project may 
require a building permit, please call our office at 978- 
356-6605. Thank you. 

******** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 



Following is the yearly report 
Licenses and Permits Issued 

Food Service 66 

Retail Food 26 

Caterer 7 

Temporary Food 27 

Mobile Food 6 

Frozen Desserts 3 

Disposal System Construction 



Permits 
Septic Haulers 
Septic Installers 
Septic System Inspectors 
Swimming Pools 
Recreational Camps 
Massage Practitioners 
Massage Establishments 
Tanning Facilities 
Private Well Permits 
Tobacco 

Funeral Directors 
Health Inspections 
and Investigations 
Food Service Inspections 
Housing Inspections 
Nuisance & Environmental 

Complaints 
Percolation Tests 
Deep Hole Observations 
Septic System Inspections 



197 
23 
56 
30 
10 

5 
31 
14 

2 

3 
24 

2 



199 
14 

28 
105 
226 
392 



of activities for 2005: 
Swimming Pool Inspections 10 
Surface Water Testing 90 



Sealer of Weights 

& Measures Inspections 

Liquid Measuring Meters 73 
Scales & Balances 94 

Scanners 14 



72 



Community Health 
Immunization and Clinics Public Health Follow-up 



Influenza 


231 


Lyme Disease 


74 


Pneumonia 


2 


Camphylobactor 


2 


Tetanus 


1 


Enterovirus 


2 


Well Elderly 


12 


Salmonella 


4 


Clinics 












Babesiosis 


1 






Hepatitis B 


2 






Hepatitis C 


4 






Ehrlichiosis 


2 






Tuberculosis 


1 






Giardia 


3 






Rickettsia 


1 






Pertussis 


2 






MRSA 


1 



Board of Health Members: Susan Hubbard, Chairperson, Carl 
Hiltunen and Spencer Amesbury. 



++****** 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Gambale, Chairman 

Dana P.Jordan, Vice-Chair 

Marie Rodgers, Administrative Assistant 

In 2005, forty-seven petitions were submitted to the Zoning 
Board of Appeals: twenty-six special permit requests, all but 
one of which were granted, two were withdrawn; twenty-five 
variance requests, all but four of which were denied and six 
were withdrawn, one administratively withdrawn; seven appeals 
of the Building Inspector' s decision, two were upheld, four 
withdrawn, and one was granted; and two requests for 
Comprehensive Permit which remain on-going. 

The YMCA of the North Shore, Inc. (Powder House Village) 
Comprehensive Permit, under Chapter 40B, to develop 
forty-eight affordable residential rental units in two 
buildings at 108 County Road, in the RRA Zoning District, at 
112 County Road, in the HB Zoning District. And the proposal 
for a mixed-use building, with eighteen residential units and 
three commercial condominiums was granted by the Board in 



73 



October of 2004; Superior Court judge affirmed the Appeals 
Board decision dated 10/13/04. The public hearing review 
process required twelve months. 

82 Topsfield Road, Ipswich Pines request for a Comprehensive 
Permit, under Chapter 40B, to construct forty residential 
condominium townhouses, ten affordable units available to 
mostly first-time home buyers from Ipswich was granted in 
August 2005. The public hearing review process required 
twelve months. 

187 County Road, Two Rivers, LLC requested a 
Comprehensive Permit, under Chapter 40B to construct 
twenty- four condominiums, of which 25% would be 
affordable. The first hearing was held in March 2005; 
and as of January 2006, the public hearing process 
remains open. 

43 Avery Street requested a Comprehensive Permit under 
Chapter 40B to construct twelve (12) residential units, 
of which 25% would be affordable. The first hearing was 
held in July 2005; and as of January 2006, the public 
hearing process remains open. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is a seven members adjudicatory 
body appointed by the Board of Selectman with five permanent- 
term members and two alternates. Member Kevin Lombard was 
re-appointed, as were alternate members Robert Bodwell and 
Timothy Perkins. 

The Board extends appreciation to Jim Sperber, Building 
Inspector, and Eric Coville, Building Administrative 
Assistant for their support, and commends Marie Rodgers for 
an outstanding transition as new ZBA Administrative 
Assistant . 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT - Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for 
guiding the development and conservation of land in the 
Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range 



74 



plans. It does this in part by providing support and 
guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: Planning Board, Conservation Commission, the 
Historical Commission, and the Affordable Housing 
Partnership (reports on their activities are given below) . 
The Department also provides support to the Open Space 
Committee and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are 
some of the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 
2005: 

> Prepared an Affordable Housing Plan pursuant to the 
Planned Production Regulation under the 40B statute. The 
Plan, which assesses housing need in the community and 
identifies potentially suitable locations for additional 
affordable housing development, will allow the Town, 
under certain conditions, to defer ill-conceived 40B 
housing proposals for a year or more; 

> Negotiated a purchase and sales agreement between the 
Town and Entertainment Management Corporation for the 
purchase of the former town hall and its reuse as a 
theater, coffeehouse, bookstore, and other retail 
establishments. Continued to work with the buyer on 
addressing remaining issues so that property can be 
conveyed; 



> Drafted several zoning articles for fall town meeting, 
including one that establishes an advisory Design Review 
board to conduct design review of commercial and multi- 
family development in the town, and another that rezoned 
ten parcels along the Topsfield Road corridor near the 
commuter rail station from In-town Residence Zoning to 
General Business; 



Under the leadership of the Open Space Program manager, 
made significant progress toward the acquisition of 
approximately 86 acres of important salt marsh and 
coastal wildlife habitat on Great Neck owned by the 
Proprietors of Great Neck, Inc. By year's end, the Town 
had received grants of $846,000 from the US Fish and 
Wildlife Service, $500,000 from the Massachusetts Self- 
Help Program, $54,000 from the Massachusetts Department 
of Conservation and Recreation, and $11,000 from the 
Fields Pond Foundation, for a total of $1,411,000 in 
financial assistance toward the Great Neck acquisition. 



75 



Negotiations with the landowners were ongoing as of this 
writing, with high hopes that agreement on a purchase 
price would be reached soon; 








•• s *»* > 

Great Neck Property - Pasture Pond, Site of 
Black-Crowned Night Heron Rookery 

> Under the aegis of the person of the stewardship 
coordinator, Beth O'Connor, oversaw the near completion 
of the parking area at the Dow Brook Conservation Area on 
High Street; facilitated approval for constructing an 
additional playing field at Mile Lane Athletic Fields, 
while continuing to participate with the Athletic Field 
Study Committee in the search of property to establish as 
municipal recreational fields; and collaborated with 
members of the Conservation Commission, the Open Space 
Committee and the Bay Circuit Committee to develop a 
volunteer Land Stewards Program; 

> Continued to work closely with and assist the Community 
Development Plan Implementation Task Force undertake its 
responsibility to advocate for and implement the 2003 
CDP; 



> Continued coordination and oversight of the Downtown 
Riverwalk Project, which is now 90% complete and 
scheduled to open in the spring of 2006; 



76 






> Facilitated the establishment of the Affordable Housing 
Trust Fund Commission, which directs the expenditure of 
funds obtained primarily from developer payment-in-lieu 
of fees. 



In July of this year, the Department welcomed David Koonce 
as its new Open Space Program Manager. In welcoming David, 
we once again bid farewell to Tracie Hines, who had 
returned for nearly a year while the Town searched for a 
suitable candidate to replace her. 

PLANNING BOARD 

Charles Allen, Co-Chair 
Tim Purinton, Co-Chair 

2005 was a busy and productive year for the Planning Board. 
The Board continued to function efficiently under the dual 
leadership structure adopted in 2003, with co-chair Tim 
Purinton in the role of chair for Board meetings and 
Charlie Allen assuming the lead role in developing zoning- 
related items for Fall Town Meeting. John Soininen was 
appointed to the Board in January to replace departing 
member David Santomenna; Bob Weatherall and Mike Ryan 
continued as full Board members. Associate member Jim 
Monahan resigned from the Board in November and was 
replaced by Emily Levin. 

Planning Matters 

The Board continued to assume a pivotal role in 
implementing the Community Development Plan (CDP) , adopted 
by the Town in 2003. Led by co-chair Charlie Allen, the 
Board sponsored four articles for vote at Town Meeting, all 
of which passed. In addition to the Design Review and 
General Business Expansion articles, the zoning changes 
included a major revision to the regulations governing home 
occupations, to encourage their use while ensuring adequate 
standards to protect the neighborhoods in which they are 
located. 

In addition to the zoning changes, the Board continues its 
work on updating Ipswich's Subdivision Regulations; 
adoption of the regulations is anticipated in the spring of 
2006. 



77 



Regulatory Matters 

2004 saw a small decline in regulatory activity before the 
Board, perhaps an early reflection of the slowing of the 
housing market. The Board reviewed a total of ten special 
permit applications, including a proposed car wash at 210 
High Street, residential units in accessory buildings at 
152 County Road and 87 High Street, an open space 
preservation zoning development on Mill Road, and a multi- 
family building at 10 Wayne Avenue. Eight of the ten 
applications were ultimately approved with modifications; 
two were withdrawn by the applicants. The Board reviewed 
two site plan review applications (EBSCO parking garage and 
proposed industrial building at 49 Turnpike Road) . One was 
approved, and the other is still under review. Two 
definitive subdivisions applications were submitted in 2004 
(two-lot subdivision off of Paradise Road and a one-lot 
subdivision off of Topsfield Road). At year's end, one was 
approved and the other was still under consideration. The 
Board also reviewed and endorsed ten applications for ANR 
(Approval Not Required under Subdivision Control Law) 
Plans. 

The Board was pleased to note an increasingly level of 
compliance with the provisions of the Scenic Road bylaw; 
review is required by the Planning Board when property 
owners intend to relocate or remove stone walls or cut down 
trees within the Town right-of-way on designated scenic 
road. A total of four such applications were reviewed in 
2005. 

Finally, the Board wishes once again to thank Glenn Gibbs, 
Director of Planning and Development, and Kate Day, 
Assistant Planner, for their tireless assistance on our 
behalf. 

******** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 
Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 
David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 
Frances Doyle, Recording Secretary 



The Conservation Commission is composed of seven appointed 
town residents who serve as unpaid volunteers: David 
Standley, Jennifer Hughes, Glenn Wood, Ann McMenemy, 
Barbara Beaman, Sissy ffolliott and Brian O'Neill. Brian 
commenced the year as an associate member but was elevated 
to full membership by the Town Manager when Commissioner Ed 
Dick stepped down after several terms of service. The 
Commission thanks Mr. Dick and wishes him well in future 
endeavors. There are two other associate members, Cynthia 
Ingelfinger and Sharon Cushing. Frances Doyle joined the 
staff in March as the new Recording Secretary. 

The Commission serves the public and Town regarding 
conservation and land preservation activities in the 
community; but most of its time is occupied with its formal 
role as the local environmental regulatory board under the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Ipswich 
Wetlands Protection Bylaw. In 2005 it again played a 
significant role in land acquisition/ management issues of 
open space in concert with the Open Space Committee, Open 
Space Program Manager and the Board of Selectmen. 

In 2005, the Commission continued regulatory oversight of 
several complex projects, including New England Biolabs' 
project on County Road and Turner Hill's construction of an 
eighteen hole golf course with housing development on 
Topsfield Road. Additionally, it heard applications for 
the significant revamping of wastewater collection and 
disposal for the entire isthmus of Little Neck, various 
elements of which unfolded over the entire year. The 
Commission took over 131 official regulatory actions, with 
major filings listed below. Numerous emergencies and 
ongoing violations were also dealt with but are not listed. 
This list compares the 2005 permitting activities with the 
previous six calendar years, to indicate trends and changes 
in the various tabulated categories. 



Activity 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


2003 


2004 


2005 


Orders of 

Conditions/ 

Amendments 


63 


40 


43 


40 


39 


61 


56 


Orders Resource Area 
Delineation 







5 


2 


7 


3 


4 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


26 


45 


27 


21 


33 


41 


31 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


25 


13 


24 


17 


17 


18 


21 


Extension Permits 


2 


14 


12 


4 


5 


6 


6 



79 



Enforcement Actions 


8 


10 


8 


7 


15 


17 


13 


Totals* (incl other) 


201 


166 


155 


137 


155 


213 


131 



[*Tabulations of "Totals" have been done variously] 

To accomplish the permitting process, Commission members 
attended 24 regularly scheduled evening meetings, visited 
numerous projects and fielded dozens of Citizen's Queries. 
Staff continues to respond to hundreds of routine queries, 
and to inspect all proposed project sites before hearings 
and during project activities. 

As it did in 2004, the Commission continued to deal with 
several difficult situations of direct non-compliance with 
the laws and regulations and with Commission Orders. As 
well, the Commission continued to struggle with the complex 
issue of determining appropriate responses to environmental 
changes resulting from beaver activity. Although a 
satisfactory unified methodology of dealing with this 
beaver activity increase has not yet been achieved, the 
Commission remains committed to working with other Town 
boards to address the ongoing management of this increased 
activity. 



• ***•*•*** 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Moss Jr., Chairman 

A preliminary inventory of some of Ipswich' s older homes 
was prepared in 2005 by Matthew Cummings and research 
assistant Sue Nelson. This inventory will serve as a 
resource for the commission and other town offices to 
insure that changes to the major historical structures in 
town are reviewed by the Commission. The Commission is 
planning a major inventory of all first through third 
period homes (those built before 1820) in the next year. It 
is estimated that there are over one hundred such homes. In 
addition, the inventory forms (Massachusetts Historical 
Commission Form B's) which are already on file, are in need 
of updating, as new and more comprehensive inventory forms 
are now available. 

Several properties were brought before the Commission in 
2005. The Commission authorized a research report on the 
Day-Dodge House at the corner of N. Main and East Street. 
It appears that this early double house contains elements 
of at least the first three periods of home construction. 



80 



The house is presently under renovation, and the Commission 
is following its progress. It is anticipated that the 
house will be saved with only minor alterations, and that a 
new historical restriction will supplement the existing 
restriction on a portion of the house. This property is 
also going to house the early shoemaker' s shop which has 
been preserved by Carl Gardner on his Wood's Lane property 
for years. In addition, the Historical Commission has been 
working closely with the buyers of the Old Town Hall on 
their plans for renovation. The Commission recently 
approved a preservation restriction protecting the 
building's exterior and principal structural members; the 
agreement is now under review by the State Historical 
Commission. 

Other significant preservation projects approved by the 
Commission in 2005 include the removal and preservation of 
an historic barn from County Road to the property at 41 
Turkey Shore Rd. (The Schutte family has been meticulously 
maintaining the Turkey Shore home for years and continues 
their preservation efforts with the barn.), and renovations 
to homes at 28 County Street and 110 High Street (John 
Kimball, Jr. house), following advisory reports prepared by 
Sue Nelson. 

Other properties which sought Commission approval for 
alterations or additions included the Ipsv/ich Mills 
warehouse building which sits by the commuter rail tracks. 
Slight exterior renovations were approved for the window 
openings to make the building more appropriate for its 
present use by EBSCO Publishing. EBSCO will also be the 
site of a mural depicting the history of Ipswich which is 
being painted on the side of one of the company' s 
buildings. Additions were approved for the building now 
owned by New England Biolabs (the old Procter estate) . The 
small house known as "Mary' s house" on the Turner Hill 
estates (the "Rice" estate) was approved to be moved to a 
new location on the property and otherwise preserved in its 
original condition. We are fortunate that all of these 
corporate citizens have been particularly sensitive of the 
history of Ipswich. 

Finally, two historical sites were commemorated. Sawmill 
Point park was dedicated after several years of planning 
and work by the Shurcliff family and the Planning 
Department. The park on County Street was the centuries old 
site of Mills at the lower falls of the Ipsv/ich River. 



81 



Across town near the site of the former Brown' s mill a 
plaque was dedicated to the Brown' s Mill historic district 
and the contributions of the residents of that district. 




The rain didn' t dampen the celebration of the completion 

of Sawmill Park 

The demolition delay by-law was enforced by the Commission 
in an effort to stop the destruction of a single-family 
house at 51 East Street. Members of the Doucet family who 
had lived on the property for several generations asked for 
permission to demolish the house and replace it with a 
duplex for their families. A public hearing was held at 
which strong feelings were expressed by the family, 
neighbors and other citizens. The delay remained in effect 
until March of this year at which time it became apparent 
the house could not be saved. Efforts were made by the 
family to find a buyer and by the Commission to find 
someone who would purchase and move the house. Sadly the 
house was lost to demolition this year. It is hoped that by 
working together we can prevent a similar fate for other 
historic structures in Ipswich. 

Portions of Ipswich homes and Ipswich property are 
preserved in Museums around the country (including those in 
the Smithsonian, New York, Brooklyn and Pennsylvania) . The 
citizens of Ipswich remain the curators of the largest 
living early American history museum in the United States. 
We should continue to appreciate and protect the assets of 



32 




our town. With the help of the Board of Selectmen, the 
Planning Board, the Building Department, and the people of 
Ipswich, the Commission is looking forward to another 
productive year 2006. 



+ •*•-*--*--*- + -*•* 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf, Chairman 

Under the leadership of Chairman Michael Schaaf, the 
Ipswich Affordable Housing Partnership had a productive and 
successful year. In addition to its work on the Affordable 
Housing Plan, the primary achievement of the Partnership in 
2005 was its role in creating three affordable housing 
units in the center of town. Upon learning that a two-unit 
rental property at 98 Central Street was being converted to 
condominiums, the Partnership recruited the North Shore 
Housing Trust (NSHT) to attempt to buy the property for the 
creation of affordable housing. After months of discussion 
and negotiation between the Town, NSHT, and the owner, the 
property was acquired by NSHT in December with a $150,000 
subsidy from the Town ($80,000 in Affordable Housing Trust 
funds and $70,000 in HOME funds). In exchange for the 
funds, deed restrictions were placed on the property which 
require that the two existing units be permanently 
affordable to households earning no more than 80% of the 
regional median household income, and requiring that a 
third unit to be created in an existing accessory building 
be permanently affordable to a household earning no more 
than 100% of the regional median household income. 

Other initiatives undertaken by the Partnership in 2005 
included: 

> Providing $6,500 in down payment assistance to an 
individual purchasing at 18 Green Street, under the 
Town' s first-time homebuyer program; 

> Advocating for the establishment of a part-time 
housing coordinator position in the Planning Office to 
assist with the affordable housing effort; 

^ Reviewing, with project proponents, proposed housing 
developments, including a 14 unit 14 unit 40B multi- 
family rental development at 43 Avery Street, a 40B 
proposal consisting of 20 duplexes on Town Farm Road, 



83 



and a proposed 40B multi-family apartment building at 
the end of Locust Road; 

> Recommending the allocation of an additional $35,000 
in HOME funds, matched by a private donation of equal 
amount, to allow the Whipple Annex elderly housing 
development to move forward; 

> Adopting updated goals & strategies that are them 
fully consistent with, and as comprehensive as, the 
goals and policies of the Community Development Plan' s 
housing component; 

> Assisting the Planning Board to derive a new formula 
for Payment in Lieu of developing an affordable unit; 
and 

> Monitoring the foreclosure proceedings and advising 
town officials on 19 New Mill Place, an affordable 
unit created under a Planning Board special permit, to 
ensure that town would receive surplus proceeds from 
sale to reuse for affordable housing efforts. 

Current members of the Partnership are Michael Schaaf, Don 
Bowen, Ed Dick, William "Jay'' Gallagher, Don Greenough, 
Mike Jones, and Jim Warner. Staff assistance in 2005 was 
provided by Glenn Gibbs, Marie Rodgers, and Kate Day. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain 
a variety of programs, services, and activities to enhance 
the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our 
citizens. Our starfish logo, adopted to symbolize our 
efforts to make a difference in the lives of local children 
and families, was added to our staff shirts and newsletters 
to promote this message. 

Community events included the July 4th parade & field day, 
a Halloween parade & program, and parades on Memorial Day 
and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' groups. 
Programs featured an outdoor concert by the West Newbury 
Volunteer Fire Association Band as well as two by the 



84 






Ipswich Community Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a magic show by 
Rich Nunziato on our annual "Harry Potter' s Birthday" 
celebration, and a Kids Dog Show with a demonstration by 
the Old Colony Obedience Club. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school 
courts, and a grant from the U.S. Tennis Association funded 
team tennis competition for some of the older, experienced 
players. Golf lessons at Ipswich Country Club were 
repeated as well as Workreation job training and social 
events for young teens, Jr. Summer Fun, our annual youth 
Sand Sculpture Day at Crane' s Beach, and drop-in activities 
at Bialek Park with optional field trips. Swim lessons were 
contracted at the YMCA, and resident lot parking attendants 
were funded at Crane's Beach. 

Fall activities included after school programs with 
homework and computer projects, crafts, adventure and 
sports activities, chess, cooking, quilting and knitting 
projects, and weekly off-site trips to museums, movies, 
mini-golf, and bowling activities. Winter programs included 
two learn-to-ski programs for grades 3-5 and 6-8, February 
vacation week adventures including a Harry Potter Day and 
April vacation activities were highlighted by a tour of 
Fenway Park for young Red Sox fans. Golf classes were again 
offered at the Rowley Country Club for children during 
spring and fall seasons. Adult activities included free 
volleyball and ping pong sessions as well as user funded 
classes in bridge, sewing, and knitting. 



85 







Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen and 
snack bar area, cafeteria/lounge, crafts room, and 
gymnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department so 
that a number of local sports, scouts, and social service 
agencies could hold meetings and offer programs for 
residents of all ages. Gym space was shared by many youth 
basketball teams in the winter, wrestling during the 
summer, and cheerleading in the fall. 

A donation was received from the Friends of Ipswich 
Athletics to provide seed money for playground equipment to 
be designed and funded over the next several years for the 
Bialek Park site that was constructed in 1989. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation 

Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss 

programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for 

the future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of 
programs . 



86 






+ -* + -*--*-* + + 



YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the 
lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of varied 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of 
this unique population. Our foundation continues to be 
community collaboration, and many programs were developed as 
joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response 
to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer 
teens, church youth groups, and those referred through the 
local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. Several middle 
school students volunteered after school and a variety of 
youth assisted with Friday Night Programs. Community service 
was expanded to included adult volunteers and we had a 
successful parent volunteer program for our Friday Night 
Activities . 

After school clubs continued, led by local students and 
experts recruited to teach a variety of classes. Homework 
sessions led by staff and supportive volunteers were 
incorporated into the daily programs, and inter- 
generational experiences with senior citizens helping to 
teach children knitting and quilting. Cooking class was a 
huge success. Children learned to cook simple, nutritious 
meals. Thursday early release days provided opportunities 
for field trips to various educational and recreational 
sites. Chess was introduced and sports continue to be 
popular . 

Talk To a Friend, our peer leadership program for Ipswich 
Youth, met weekly to receive training based on current youth 
issues. Many of them attended a regional conference on 
conflict resolution. Peer Leaders also helped chaperone 
activities for younger children, assumed some mentoring and 
mediation responsibilities, and organized intergeneration 
suppers with local senior citizens. Guest speakers were 
brought in to facilitate discussions on local issues. 

The Zone Cafe continued serving as a focal point for teen 
programs, and a web site was developed to survey local 
teens' suggestions about new programs and activities. Middle 
School drop-in nights and dances continued weekly to serve 
younger teens. The student-operated snack bar provided on 
site training in retail sales and management while offering 



87 



reasonably price items to attendees. Teens were also an 
integral part of the creation of a written policy manual 
for Cafe operations. Also, a once a month Saturday Coffee 
house was established for older teens. 

Family advocacy services were provided on an as-needed basis 
to families in need who met with the youth director to 
determine their current needs and secure connections to 
available services. Regular meetings provided further 
monitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, 
the director was available for after-hours support and crisis 
intervention for at-risk families. 

Regular training sessions were provided for summer and school 
year staff members to maintain their skills in safety 
practices, basic first aid, motivation of students, conflict 
resolution, and group management. Summer staff trainings were 
scheduled as weekly sessions combining theory and hands-on 
experiences that enabled all staff to learn new skills. 



***••*-•*■** 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich 
were provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging 
Services . 

A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town 
Hall. Three part-time receptionists welcomed guests, 
answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation 
of the center. 

Regular programs included the Silver Strands choral group, 
a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting 
and quilting groups, art classes and a monthly lunch club. 
Health-related programs included monthly health screenings, 
weekly blood pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, 
massage, hearing clinics, Tai Chi, tennis, exercise and 
line dancing classes, and a swimming group. The COA Travel 
Club attended an overseas trip sponsored by the Friends of 
the Ipswich Elderly, and day trips to various locations 
were held throughout the year. 

Special offerings included inter-generational programs, a 
dining program, an Alzheimer's disease seminar, an options 
in senior living program, a reverse mortgage seminar, free 



cardiovascular screenings, help with Medicare Part D, a 
stroke prevention workshop, an Elderlaw Education program, 
a summer picnic, a North Shore Youth Symphony recital, 
computer clinics, speakers on a variety of health, 
financial and legal issues, social gatherings for special 
observances and classes for a wide range of interests. A 
monthly newsletter written by the Director reached 1,700 
elder households through support of local advertisers and a 
grant for postage. A Caregivers Support Group helped those 
dealing with frail elders. The Director continued to 
coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program 
that placed five senior citizens in paid positions in 
various town departments. 

A new handicapped accessible, 12-passenger van provided 
local transportation to Ipswich seniors. Ipswich senior 
citizens were provided over 5,500 one-way rides on the COA 
van, logging approximately 19,000 miles of service. The 
Friends group continued to raise funds and support projects 
that fell outside of the COA budget. The Friends also 
contributed to a Christmas party for 185 seniors held at 
the gymnasium at the town hall and for a portion of the new 
van. Grants from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and 
the Coburn Charitable Society provided a part-time 
administrative assistant, a part-time activities 
coordinator, and a volunteer recognition luncheon. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 32 volunteers who 
provided 1,690 hours of volunteer service to local elders. 
This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 
citizens 16,352 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. 
Other services of the Outreach program included social 
visits, phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in 
making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. 
Other assistance programs included Money Management and 
Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation 
provided by trained AARP volunteers. 

A seven-member council met monthly to review programs and 
operations and to plan additional offerings. 



89 



~k~k~k'k'k"k~k~k~k 



EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Terrance P. Hart, District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 115 Massachusetts 
General Laws with providing services to veterans, their 
survivors and dependents. Principal workload under state 
law includes the administration of aid to veterans and 
dependents. Communities fund this program, which is 
subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year by 
the Commonwealth. This is a need based program; and the 
department is required to conduct periodic comprehensive 
review of the cases to insure no substantive facts have 
changed, while working with the veteran to identify 
alternative or long-term solutions to individual 
circumstances. During the calendar year, 14 Ipswich 
veterans/widows were on this program for varying periods. 
Under state law, the department also assists qualified 
veterans to obtain bonuses, and qualified veterans, widows 
and parents to obtain state annuities, property tax 
abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive 
interaction within the federal community, principally with 
the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service 
Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in 
filing for pensions, service connected injury/illness 
compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for 
survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, insurance claims, 
decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits 
processed by this department are paid directly to those 
eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. The VA 
sent approximately $1.25 million to eligible recipients in 
Ipsv/ich, of which the current staff is responsible for 
approximately $485,000 dollars paid to or saved by those 
assisted in Ipswich. 

Additionally, the department interacts within the federal 
community to correct military records, obtain needed 
documentation, and insure veterans/dependents receive 
awards and recognition to which they are entitled. The VSO 
provided information, advice or assistance to 110 of the 
Town's 1,150 identified veterans and 20 of the 284 
identified veterans' widows during 2005. We also provide 
support and information assistance for National Guard and 



90 



Reserves called up for service in Iraq or Afghanistan and 
their families. 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia 
Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues at the local, 
state and federal level, interact with elected and 
appointed officials on issues, and work with local 
organizations in serving the community. Key state 
legislation passed in 2005 included an omnibus bill 
entitled "The Welcome Home Bill" that provided bonuses for 
military personnel serving since September 11, 2001, 
increased annuities for 100% service-connected disabled 
veterans and Gold Star parents and wives, and special 
benefits to Massachusetts National Guard personnel called 
to active duty. The department also provided information, 
assistance and guidance for senior citizens in determining 
their needs for Medicare D insurance. 

The Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of 
Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, Rowley, Wenham and 
West Newbury. A Board of Directors consisting of one 
selectman (or designee) from each town maintains oversight 
Mr. James Foley is the Ipswich member of the Board of 
Directors . 

******** 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Tim Henry - Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

Tim Henry, Manager 

Energy prices soared in the second half of 2005 due to 
damage sustain to the natural gas infrastructure in the 
gulf coast region as a result of hurricanes Katrina and 
Rita. The department's exposure to the spot energy market 
during this period caused local energy prices to be 
especially high. As a result, the department is taking 
measures to decrease spot market exposure to insure 
stability in our local rates. 

Work on the installation of a new capacitor bank at the 
High Street substation was completed in 2005. This was a 
joint project between the Ipswich Light Department and 
National Grid. This work, along with the new tie lines 
which supply the town with electricity, has improved the 
reliability of the power supplied to the Town. There were 



91 



no outages attributed to the power supplied to the Town in 
2005 as opposed to seven incidents in 2004. 

A failure of the main transformer at Fowlers Lane in early 
June left much of the downtown area without power. This new 
transformer was sent back to the manufacturer and repaired 
under warranty and placed back into service in November. 

A new energy peak was set on July 27, 2005, when we used 
26.6 mwh of electricity. This was a 25% increase over the 
2004 peak of 21.4 mwh used on August 3, 2004, and 20% 
higher than the all time peak daily usage of 22.2 mwh which 
was set on August 14, 2002. 

Kwh sales 

2004 sales: 98,137,000 

2005 sales 106,427,000 



******** 



WATER DIVISION 

Tim Henry, Manager 

The Division actively promotes water conservation measures 
and continued the seasonal rate structure which was started 
in 2003 to curb excessive summer water use. A system-wide 
leak detection was conducted for the fifth consecutive year 
and has been very helpful in detecting sub-surface leaks 
throughout the water distribution system. 

The Green/Summer Street water main replacement project was 
designed, bid and under construction in late 2005. New 
ductile iron water mains will replace the existing 1004- 
year old cast iron pipes. The contract was awarded to 
Revoli Construction Co. of North Reading. The project 
marks the first combined water and drainage project 
undertaken jointly by the Utilities and Public Works 
Departments. The water portion of the project is expected 
to be completed in early 2006.. 

NEW MAINS 

There were two (2) extensions to the distribution system in 
2005: 

6-14 Essex Road (Southgate) - 440 feet of 8" CLDI pipe 

43 Avery Street (LeBlanc Drive) - 220 feet of 6" CLDI pipe 



92 






2005 

New Domestic Services 42 

Hydrants Installed 2 

Hydrants Replaced 2 

New Water Mains Installed (ft) 660 

Total Length of Mains (ft) 494,895 

Water Services 

Metered Services 4,590 

Unmetered Services 90 Fire Lines 

Water Usage (Million Gallons) 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 222 

Brown' s Well 85 

Essex Road Well 19 

Fellows Road Well 32 

Mile Lane Well 29 

Winthrop Wells 18 

Total Water Usage (MG) 405 

*■*••*■*•*** 

WATER FILTRATION PLANT 

Joyce S. Kippen, Superintendent 

This has been a year of challenges for the Water Treatment 
Plant staff. 

July 4 th weekend was busy with three water breaks on 
Jeffrey' s Neck Road, which resulted in a total Colif orm 
violation following our routine bacteria monitoring. (The 
episode quickly cleared up, and no further occurrences have 
happened. ) 

In September there was a monitoring violation for chlorite. 
In November the siphoning of potassium hydroxide into the 
clearwell caused a high pH water release into the 
distribution system. The Town' s emergency reverse 911 
system was implemented, and homeowners that were affected 
were notified by Town personnel. The distribution system 
was flushed thoroughly, and normal water quality was 
quickly restored. Revised operational procedures/equipment 
have been put in place at the WTP to prevent any similar 
occurrences . 



93 



The WTP basin mixers and electronic speed controls were 
upgraded and the sedimentation basin sludge collector 
system was refurbished. 

A new perimeter fence was installed around Town Hill Tank 
and a barrier gate was installed for Browns Well. 

******** 



WASTEWATER DIVISION 

John A. Quigley, Jr., Superintendent 

We have strived to make corrections in our process control 
to assist us in less violations. 

We feel the plant is running better than ever before, and I 
give the staff credit for this. It is a constant battle to 
stay on top of ever challenging problems. We have had to 
add additional hours to our process sludge which comes to 
us from the water filtration plant, which is a challenge in 
itself. 

For the year 2005, we treated 4001. million gallons of 

wastewater. 
We took 2,811,800 gallons of septage. 
We processed 2,124. Cu. yds. of bio-solids. 
We recorded 59.12 inches of rain. 

We received and processed 1,362,000 gal. of sludge from the 
water plant. 

The following violations occurred in 2005: 

MONTH # OF VIOLATIONS PARAMETER VIOLATED 



(2) fecal coliform (3) copper 
(1) fecal coliform 

(1) fecal coliform 

(1) fecal coliform (1) copper 

(2) fecal coliform (2) ph 
( 1 ) geometric mean 



January 05 


5 


February 05 


1 


May 05 


1 


June 05 


2 


July 05 


4 


August 05 


1 



94 






September 05 


4 


mean 




October 05 


7 


mean 




November 05 


3 


December 05 


2 



(3) fecal coliform (1) geometric 

(6) fecal coliform (1) geometric 

(2) ph (1) suspended solids 
(2)ph 



•*••****•*-* 



FINANCE DIRECTORATE - Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time 
staff and a full-time Town Accountant who also serves as 
Finance Director. The Accounting Department is 
responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all 
W-2's and 1099' s at year-end in accordance with IRS 
regulations . 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town' s revenues and 
expenditures, ensures that reconciliations are performed 
between applicable Town departments, assists in providing 
information on benefits available to employees, and 
oversees the operation of the Town's financial computer 
system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent 
audit of the Town's financial statements that was last 
completed by November 30, 2005, for the year ended June 30, 
2005. The financial results for fiscal year 2005 were good. 
This was due to good collections on receivables, and 
responsible spending of appropriations. 

Free Cash for fiscal year 2005 was certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue, Division of Local 
Services in October 2005 in the amount of $624,538. 



95 



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TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Kevin A. Merz, Treasurer/Collector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the collection 
and investment of all Town funds and the collecting of Real 
Estate taxes, Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and 
Boat excise taxes. The Treasurer/Collector's office is 
also responsible for all municipal borrowings, balancing 
cash and accounts receivable with the Town Accountant, 
selling beach stickers, processing Municipal Lien 
Certificates, and continuing collection efforts of 
properties in Tax Title. Currently, the 
Treasurer/Collector's office is in the process of 
foreclosing on 15 parcels in Land Court. 

This year, taxpayers had the ability to pay their tax bills 
online; and also by December they had the ability to 
purchase beach stickers online. In 2005, the 
Treasurer/Collector's office sold 5,687 beach stickers, 378 
fishing stickers and 34 horse stickers. 

In June, the Town said farewell to Susan LeMieux, the 
Assistant Treasurer, who retired after working 18 years in 
the Treasurer's Office. Susan was an outstanding employee 
who performed her work with the highest standards. Her 
knowledge and professionalism will be missed. Fortunately, 
Don Carter was appointed the new Assistant Treasurer. Don 
brought many years of treasury experience to the office and 
has been a great asset. Our office also welcomed Cori 
Thurlow as the new Collection Clerk. Cori has quickly 
learned her position and is continually learning new 
procedures and laws related to the entire office. A thanks 
also goes out to Corinna Warner for her outstanding 
customer service and problem solving skills as the Senior 
Clerk. Corinna has also become the new Parking Clerk. 

■k-kkk-kk-kk 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 2005, was $2,466,692,773. 



96 






The valuation of the Town by Class is: 



Class 1 
Class II 
Class III 
Class IV 



Residential 
Open Space 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 
Total: 



2,222, 622,757 

98,073,256 

130, 662, 800 

15,333, 960 



90.1054 

3.9759 
5.2971 
0.6216 
100.00 



The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2006 was $9.11 per thousand 
for all property classes. 

******** 

TOWN CLERK 

ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR 

Frances A. Richards, CMC 
Pamela Z. Carakatsane 

The year 2005 was a year of transition for the Town Clerk's 
office. After fifteen years as Town Clerk, Frances "Fran" 
Richards retired on November 4 th ' and the office welcomed 
new Town Clerk Pamela "Pam" Carakatsane of Lynnfield on 
November 7 th . 



mm 




Taken at the gathering at Town Hall to wish Fran well on her 
retirement. Left to right: Theresa "Mimi" Fanning, retired 
Hamilton Town Clerk; Representative Brad Hill; Fran Richards; 
Jane Weston, current Hamilton Town Clerk; and 
new Ipswich Town Clerk Pam Carakatsane, 



97 



Assistant Town Clerk Elise "Lee" Graves left the Clerk' s 
office on July 8 th to assume the secretarial position at the 
Police Department. Kathleen "Kathy" Marini was appointed 
September 6 th to fill Lee' s position and was appointed 
Assistant Town Clerk on November 1 st . In addition to the 
changes in staffing, there were several changes in computer 
programming. New computers were introduced in August and a 
new "dog licensing program" was installed. Volunteer Janet 
Trask spent two months updating the state computer system 
"Central Voter Registry" for the new Town Clerk. The 
former clerk' s computer system was abandoned and all future 
census and voter information will be processed in the state 
computer starting in January 2006. 




Kathy Marini being sworn in as Assistant Town Clerk 

By Fran Richards 

The office is responsible for local and state elections, 
census and voter registration and recording and 
certification of all official actions of the Town, 
including town meeting legislation and appropriations. We 
are also responsible for the recording, maintenance and 
issuance of vital records. In addition to processing and 
issuing licenses and permits approved by the Board of 
Selectmen, we also handle the sale of various licenses 
including dog, shellfish, fishing, hunting and marriage 
licenses; and our office serves as a general information 
center to the public. Numerous requests for certified 
copies of vital records, general information about the Town 



98 



and its activities, genealogical and historical 
information; business and legal decisions by Town boards 
and demographic statistics are received over the counter, 
through the mail and by telephone. 

We are very fortunate to have two dedicated volunteers who 
assist us with projects that we would never have time to 
complete. Special thanks to our volunteers: Janet Trask 
and Isobel Coulombe. 



Population Statistics from Resident List 
6/30/05 - 13,483 



Age breakdown of residents: 



- 


- 5 


629 


6 - 


- 11 


933 


12 - 


- 14 


522 


15 - 


- 18 


754 


19 - 


- 25 


1,004 


26 - 


- 35 


1,151 



36 - 45 2,059 

46 - 55 2,338 

56 - 65 2,014 

66 - 75 1,036 

76 - 100 1,043 



Total number of households - 5,388 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in past three years 

2003 2004 2005 
Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 

Dog Licenses 

A total of 1,932 dogs were licensed in Ipswich for 2005. 
New Deputy Animal Control Officer Matt Antczak was 
extremely helpful in clearing up all the unlicensed dogs 
for 2005. A new "dog licensing 7 ' program was installed in 
August to replace the old program that was adopted in 1993. 

My sincere thanks to Dr. Helen Noble, her staff and Animal 
Control Officer Harry Leno for conducting the Special 
Rabies Clinic at the Highway Garage on February 19 th so dogs 
could get their rabies shots before the licensing deadline. 



118 


116 


101 


117 


108 


107 


78 


74 


72 



99 



Shellfish Licenses and Permits 



2003 



2004 



2005 



Resident Yearly 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Over 70 Free Commercial 
Over 60 Free Recreational 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Daily 
Eagle Hill Stickers 



67 


93 


76 


122 


144 


120 


79 


70 


91 








15 


13 


31 


24 


80 


97 


85 


7 


11 


10 


8 


9 


3 



Revenue from 2005 shellfish licenses - $52,170.00 

Revenue Report for the Town Clerk' s Office - 2005 



Antiques & Old Metals licenses 

Auction Permits 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 

Beer & Wine Licenses 

By-Laws, Maps Sold 

Class I, II, III Licenses 

Certified Copy Fees 

Common Victuallers Licenses 

Dog Licenses 

Flammables Licenses 

Kayak License 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 

Marriage Licenses 

Miscellaneous Fees 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 

Raffle Permits 

Recording Fees 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 

Shellfish Permits 

Sporting Licenses 

Street Lists Sold 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 

Total 



$ 210.00 

500.00 

1,250.00 

10,800.00 

1,177.00 

1,600.00 

4,244.40 

4,500.00 

20,080.00 

625.00 

100.00 

43,200.00 

1,800.00 

416.80 

1,440.00 

60.00 

175.00 

3, 337.28 

6,525.00 

52, 170.00 

5, 313.50 

1,388.00 

2,800.00 

1,300.00 

$165,011.98 



Revenue sent to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $5,313.50 



100 



+ -*-*•*• + -*- + * 



ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars: 

Phillip F. Grenier, Chairman 

Robert M. Stone ' 

Orville M. Giddings 

Elizabeth McCarthy 

Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, Clerk 



The Board accepted with regret the resignation of Orville 
M. Giddings, who served on the board for six years. 
Elizabeth McCarthy was appointed August 10 th to fill his 
position on the board. Town Clerk Frances Richards retired 
from her position as Clerk to the board on November 4 th and 
Town Clerk Pamela Carakatsane assumed the Clerk' s position 
following her appointment on November 7 th . The Town 
Meetings were held at the Performing Arts Center at the 
Middle/High School on High Street and the Town Election was 
held at the YMCA on County Road. 



Town Meetings & Elections for 2005 



April 4, 2005 - 



Annual Town Meeting with 21 articles in 
the warrant - 437 voters attending 



April 12, 2005 - Annual Town Election with 3,292 votes 

cast - 36% of the total voters (9,083) 

October 17, 2005 - Special Town Meeting with 20 articles in 

the warrant - 237 voters attending 



Registered Voters by Precinct - November 4, 2005 - 9,188 



Precinct Democrat 



Unenrolled 



Total 



1 


472 


350 


2 


567 


357 


3 


382 


434 


4 


457 


372 


Totals 


1,878 


1,513 



Republican 



1,274 


2,096 


1,478 


2,402 


1,553 


2,369 


1,492 


2,321 


5,797 


9,188 



Sincere thanks to the Board of Registrars, the Election 
Officials, Jim Graffum and the workers at the Cemetery 



101 



Department, the staff at the YMCA, the staff and the 
custodians at the Middle/High School, and my son Scott 
Richards for all their help with the town meetings and 
election. 

The following served as Election Constables: Andrew Agapow, 
Armand Brouillette, Ronald Graves, Laurien Levesque, 
Charles McKenzie and John Meers. The following served as 
Election Officials: Theresa Greaney, Dorothy Levesque, Mary 
Cunningham, Carolyn Navarro, Jane Janvrin, Marlene Shannon, 
Virginia Player, Anne Matous, Dorcas Rice, Marcia Inman, 
Irene Brouillette, Virginia Comeau, Isobel Coulombe, Moira 
McLaughlin, Carol Poirier, Alice Stasiuk, Margaret 
Whittier, Janet Trask, Mary Graves, Janet Sklarz, Jeanne 
Parker, Peter Lampropoulos, Nancy Damon, Renata Gilmore and 
Diana Comeau. 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to 
develop, enhance and support the Town' s computing and 
telecommunications infrastructure and, to provide the 
systems and services necessary for the Town' s departments 
and users to fulfill their stated goals and objectives. 

A Barracuda Anti-Spam firewall was installed to intercept 
and filter town incoming email. Bothersome messages and 
viruses are now negligible. 

The MUNIS financial system major update to version 2004 was 

tested unsuccessfully and still remains at version 2003. 

Version 2005 was released mid year but has not been 
completely re-tested. 

The municipal broadband data communications link or INET is 
extremely troublesome, outdated, and continues to cause 
many interruptions for Town, Utility, and School users. Two 
Point-to-Point Tl circuits were installed for Utility and 
School administration offices to improve network 
communications . 

A complimentary COMCAST Internet connection was installed 
and put online at the Ipswich Public Library to improve 
public and private access. 



102 



Please visit the Town's web site at http : / /www . town . ipswich . ma . i 
to get the latest information on scheduled events, meetings and 
minutes. Many additions, changes and improvements have been 
implemented to provide safety information and online e-gov. 

**--*■•*•*■*••• 

PURCHASING/BUDGET /RISK MANAGEMENT 

Jane H. Spellman 
Assistant Purchasing Agent 
Risk Management Coordinator 
Safety Coordinator 

The Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all 
Department procurements with the exception of the day to 
day expenditures of the Electric Department and School 
Department; puts out to bid expenditures in excess of 
$25,000 for goods and services for all departments except 
the School Department; and bids construction contracts for 
all departments except the School Department, all in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Laws. 

In addition to present contract renewals, the following 
were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 
contracts awarded: Sewer Valve at the Town Wharf, 
Wastewater Effluent Diversion Feasibility Study, COA 12- 
passenger Handicapped Accessible Van, Food Services 
Consultant Services, Construction Equipment Rental, 
Ambulance Services, Investment Advisory Services, Office 
Supplies, 41' Articulating Device and Truck for Electric 
Department, Chemical Consortium various contracts, Annual 
Audit Services, Green Street Drainage Construction Phase 
Services, Salt Cooperative, twenty-three Snow Plowing 
contracts, Bituminous Highway Materials, and Engineering 
Services for Wind Turbine Power. 

The Purchasing Office oversaw all Workers Compensation 
long-term cases and reported all Tov/n and School employee 
injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims 
received were reported to the Town's insurance carrier. 
Insurance renewals were processed, policies received, and 
vehicle, equipment and computer inventories maintained. The 
Town Manager chose to change the Town' s insurance carrier 
commencing July 1, 2005. 



103 



The Purchasing Office was also responsible for collecting, 
editing, copying, collating and distributing 25 budget 
copies while meeting the set deadline. Budget details with 
adopted figures for FY07 Budget are inputted and 
distributed to Departments by this office after the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

The Purchasing Office has been given responsibility for the 
recording of Fixed Assets under the mandate of GASB 
Statement 34 and will be continuing to undertake this 
monumental task as well as maintaining inventory of Town 
owned property. The process is ongoing. 

This office established a Safety Committee in the year 2004 
and continued its efforts for a portion of 2005. Without 
the incentives, programs, and guidance of the former 
insurance carrier, the Safety Committee has lost its 
direction and incentive temporarily. An effort will be 
made to jumpstart once again this worthwhile endeavor in 
2006. The Safety Concern and Suggestion Form is made 
available and is still occasionally used by employees and 
citizens. Each concern is addressed and responded to. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the 
compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this 
Annual Town Report. 



******** 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections : New books added: 3,455 (Adult & Young Adult) 
1,484 (Children). New media added: 443 (Adult & Young 
Adult) 337 (Children) . Adult fiction, videocassettes and 
audiocassettes were weeded. 

Technology : The library' s public PCs were moved to the 
COMCAST server with the assistance of MIS Director Greg 
Parachojuk. 14,600+ patrons signed up to use the Internet 
PCs while 20,600+ hits were recorded on the library's web 
site in 2005. Through the generosity of EBSCO Publishing, 
our patrons gained access to 15 EBSCO reference databases. 
Assistant Director Genevieve Picard updated the library's 
website continuously with new information. Horizon software 
was upgraded. 



104 



Staff : Joining the staff was Hilary Nardone as Page in the 
Children's Room. 

Volunteers : This year, Volunteers donated over 1,280 hours 
shelving books, preparing materials, assisting the 
custodian v/ith cleaning, etc. The Tov/n and Country Garden 
Club helped maintain the library grounds; while the Ipswich 
Garden Club decorated the library for the holidays, both 
inside and outside. Dorcas Rice decorated the mantel in 
the Rogers Room for the holidays. 

Board of Trustees : The Board selected the Cape Ann Savings 
Bank to oversee the investing of library trust funds. The 
Board also appointed a new committee to investigate 
strategies for raising endowment monies for the benefit of 
the library. The Trustees voted to collect books for the 
victims of Hurricane Katrina. Over 200 books were sent to 
the victims. 

Plan of Service : Some of the activities accomplished in 
2005 included the beginning of construction on the 
library' s staff parking lot with the assistance of the 
Ipswich Department of Public Works; Ipswich Reads. ..One Book! 
program in April; processing of archival materials; 
formation of Trustees Endowment Committee; creation of a 
map of area parking places available to library patrons. 

Public Relations : The library produced two issues of its 
newsletter in 2005. The Ipswich Reads... One Book! Program 
resulted in major public relations activities, including a 
master brochure and several handouts, light pole banners, 
lapel buttons, etc. featuring a distinctive logo designed 
by Susan Edwards of ExtraMile Design. The library director 
spoke before the Ipswich Rotary Club about the success of 
the One Book Program. EBSCO Publishing chose the Ipswich 
Public Library Web Page postcard as a ^Customer Success 
Case Study.' on its new website for customers. 

IPSWICH READS 



One teak! 



Building : Roof leaks continued to be a problem. The 
estimate to repair and replace the slate roof is $180,000. 
Rep. Brad Hill and Senator Bruce Tarr have included sums in 



105 



the State's supplemental budget to assist the town with 
this project. 

Friends: The Friends supported the library this year with 
funds for new materials, children's programs and supplies, 
while presenting the usual series of entertaining evening 
programs. They also underwrote the cost of a new oak 
display table purchased from Pierce Furniture of Ipswich, 
as well as a new slide projector. The Friends also 
sponsored the annual volunteers breakfast. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of 
Lawrence R. Sweetser. The Boston Foundation made a donation 
of $10,000 to the Markos Hellenic Fund in memory of Mr. 
William G. Markos. The Trustees accepted the donation of a 
spinet piano for the Collins Meeting Room. Former Town 
Clerk Fran Richards donated a framed, photographic 
reproduction of the Town's original copy of the Declaration 
of Independence. 




Programs : The Children's Dept . offered 166 programs with 
3,682 children participating. The Radical Readers book club 
expanded to a second group under the direction of Maureen 
Fay. Betsy Johnson inaugurated a new book club for 3 rd 
graders called Book Buddies. Reference and YA Librarian 
Paula Grillo hosted a film series for Young Adults during 
the summer. The ESL program continued to match students 
with tutors. New in 2005 was a small ESL class taught by 
volunteer Sara Livermore. Lucy Meyers taught a series of 
three writing workshops for adults. 



106 



Circulation : Total circulation in 2005 was 127,871 items. 
The library borrowed 10,878 items through inter-library 
loan. 

Grants : The library received a $2000 grant from the Coburn 
Charitable Society for the purchase of large print and 
audiovisual materials. A joint grant with the Boxford Town 
Library from the Massachusetts Foundation for the 
Humanities allowed us to sponsor a series of lectures 
called Understanding the Modern Middle East. A $350 grant 
from the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation was received in support 
of the Radical Readers book club. 

Archives : The Archives Committee distributed manuscript 
materials to appropriate repositories, such as the Ipswich 
Historical Society and the Town Clerk's Office, while 
retaining approximately 1,000 manuscripts items in the 
Archives Room of the Ipswich Public Library. Volunteer 
Howard Fosdick began to organize these manuscript 
materials . 

Awards : The Massachusetts Library Association awarded the 
IPL a First Prize in Public Relations in Advertising for 
the web site postcard project. 



107 



■k-k-k-k-k-k'k-k 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT - Richard L. Korb, Superintendent 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan K. Arsenault, Chair 




Standing left to right: Jeffrey Loeb, Barry Hopping, Edmund 
Traverso, Hugh O'Flynn. Sitting left to right: Norm Sheppard, 
Dianne Ross, Joan Arsenault, student rep. Kathleen Shaughnessy 

As the members of the Ipswich School Committee reflect upon 
the events of the past year, we continue to acknowledge the 
outstanding academic, athletic and fine arts 
accomplishments that our district has achieved. Yet at the 
same time, we are facing a structural deficit where the 
educational fixed costs of the district are outpacing the 
available monies from local and state aid. For the first 
time in the history of this district the gifts, revolving 
accounts, grants, and outside funding sources have exceeded 
the amount of Chapter 70 support from the state. 

In a year when the Ipswich High School became the first 
high school in the state of Massachusetts to receive the 
"No Child Left Behind" Blue Ribbon Award, we find ourselves 
once again dismantling programs and eliminating positions 



108 



collective efforts of which have culminated in the high 
school receiving this prestigious award. We continue to 
utilize outside funding to support the school department's 
operating budget for such basics as heat, utilities, and 
transportation. In addition, we could not function without 
the fundraising and donations of numerous individuals and 
organizations such as Friends of Ipswich Athletics, Ipswich 
Music and Drama Association, Friends of Ipswich Elementary 
Schools, and Ipswich Citizens for Education to pay for 
items such as textbooks, materials, supplies, and support 
programs and services. While the School Committee is 
extremely thankful for their continued financial support, 
it is disheartening to depend on donations for the survival 
of our school system. 

The School Committee and Superintendent have been very 
active at the state level to attempt to change the Chapter 
70 funding formula. Members of the School Committee and 
the Superintendent have met numerous times at the state 
house with the Co Chairs of the Joint House and Senate 
Educational Subcommittee as well as testified to their 
committee regarding the need to reform Chapter 70. 

Finally, despite the continued dire nature of our fiscal 
funding, the School Committee remains focused and dedicated 
to providing educational excellence for all children. We 
continue to commend the teachers, administrators, support 
staff, and students for staying the course and striving for 
to achieve and maintain the highest academic standards. 
You remain our greatest asset and a credit to the 
community. 

■k-k-k-k-kk-k-k 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

The FY06 school year has once again been filled with 
numerous rewards and challenges. We continue to face 
mounting fiscal problems impacting the school district's 
ability to deliver the educational services this community 
has come to expect and deserve. Programs have been reduced 
and staff cut in order to balance the budget. 

In spite of these financial challenges, our dedicated and 
talented staff continues to adopt the philosophy that we 



109 



must always move forward, looking for ways to continue to 
improve . 

Our Birth to Three Program is flourishing, now serving over 
500 families in the community. This Program is funded by a 
grant from the state. 

Our MCAS scores place us far above the State average in 
over 90% of the categories. However, even with that 
success, we continue to strive to improve our scores and 
get better. Each year teams of teachers spend hours 
analyzing our test results and make the necessary 
adjustments in our curriculum to ensure that it is aligned 
with the State Frameworks. 

This year, the administration and the School Committee 
worked collaboratively on a number of subcommittees in the 
areas of budget development, policy development, 
technology, Feoffees, athletics, and communications. We 
also initiated, both last year and this year, a series of 
Study Committees to review different aspects of our 
programs and explore how we might improve them. Those 
Study Committee initiatives were the Nutrition and Health 
Advisory Committee, Secondary Curriculum Study Committee, 
Middle School Trips Study Committee, and Joint Town/School 
Study Committee on Plant/Facilities. As a result of these 
Study Committees, new initiatives and programs have been 
developed. 

The FY06 school year also saw the continuation of the 
Elementary Capital Improvements Projects addressing Phase 
II of the Doyon Window Project, as well as the Winthrop 
Driveway Project. 

Ipswich High School was once again recognized for its 
outstanding educational programs as a "National Blue Ribbon 
High School," the only high school in Massachusetts so 
designated, and only one of 38 schools nationwide. This 
award is given by the U.S. Department of Education. 

The Ipswich Public Schools continue to be recognized across 
the Commonwealth as a leader in the area of integration of 
technology in the curriculum. Ipswich Middle School was 
selected by the Massachusetts Department of Education to be 
one of 10 schools in the Commonwealth to "pilot" online 
MCAS testing. Within this rich technology-enhanced 
learning environment, the teacher creates a challenging 



110 



project-centered interdisciplinary classroom. The ultimate 
goal of this kind of educational culture is to have 
students become self-directed learners who strive toward 
continuous improvement through reflection and self- 
assessment . 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to 
the citizens of Ipswich who have given so generously to 
support quality education for all children. I urge every 
citizen to join school officials in our continuing effort 
to lobby for change in the State funding formula, which 
would make it more equitable and balanced. A community's 
ability to pay must be considered when developing any new 
State formula supporting education. 

Finally, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the 
staff of the Ipswich Public Schools, whose dedication and 
commitment to excellence is second to none. 



*•*••***•*•* 



■ , - ■';'.'/ 



- *>***8S*> 



COMMONWEAI.TH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF EOUCATtON 
20O3 EXEMPLARY SCHOOLS PROGRAM 



* -' 





IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

The year 2005 was a particularly noteworthy one for Ipswich 
High School. The receipt of two major awards brings unique 
recognition to our outstanding school. In June, IHS 
received a Vanguard Award from Mass Insight for Education. 



Ill 



We were one of eleven schools in the state recognized as a 
model of excellence. 

In September of 2005, IHS was notified that we had been 
selected as a 2005 NCLB Blue Ribbon School. As one of only 
two schools in Massachusetts receiving thi.s award, we are 
the first Massachusetts High School to be recognized with 
this award in the last four years. Ipswich High School is 
one of only thirty-eight high schools in the nation to 
receive this designation. United States Congressman John 
Tierney, Commissioner David Driscoll, Senator Bruce Tarr 
and Representative Brad Hill joined our school in 
recognizing this award at a school-wide assembly to 
celebrate this most prestigious award. 



«0$ 



,4 





The year 2005 was also noteworthy for a Boys Basketball 
State Championship won at The Garden in March. That same 
month, the Jazz Bank was awarded a Gold Medal at the state 
competition, the music program was selected as a Grammy 
winner, one of only 100 programs in the country. The 
Company, our drama group, made it to the semi-finals of the 
Globe Drama Competition. Our Boys Soccer team won the 
Division 3 Eastern Massachusetts championship while losing 
in overtime in the state final. 

The graduating Class of 2005 sent 89% of its members on to 
two or four year colleges. SAT scores were at an all time 
high for IHS with this class. Among the schools our top 



112 



graduates are attending includes: M.I.T., Univ. of 
Virginia, Duke, Holy Cross, Boston College, Tufts, Berklee 
College of Music, and Mass. College of Art. The class as a 
whole was accepted at over 150 colleges and universities. 

The year 2005 also marked the completion of our decennial 
review by the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. This accrediting body wrote a very positive and 
complimentary report in awarding us a new ten year 
accreditation status. 

As has become the custom, generous parents and benefactors 
donated funds directly to Ipswich High School which allowed 
the school to add textbooks and technology despite a very 
tight budget. I.C.E. (Ipswich Citizens for Education) and 
the Friends of Athletics made generous contributions again 
this year. 

The year 2005 goes down as a banner year for Ipswich High 
School . 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in 
my eleventh year as principal of this dynamic and exciting 
school. We are now in the sixth year in this building, 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here 
together. The school design has allowed us to get to know 
our students very quickly, and each grade has developed its 
own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The 
facility has allowed students and teachers to access state 
of the art technology as well as world-class art, music, 
and drama programs. Our students continue to learn "new 
basics" along v/ith the old ones, as we find that both are 
truly important in today's world of work. 



113 




Educating students has never been more challenging with the 
added mandated testing we now administer in all grades. 
Test results we received validated the good work being done 
in our classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is 
completed every spring, and Ipswich continues to do well. 
Ipswich Middle School was also chosen to be one of the 
first schools to pilot MCAS testing online in a wireless 
environment. Students overwhelmingly preferred the 
keyboard to handwritten testing. We will continue to be 
part of the Department of Education' s efforts to improve 
assessment . 




< ^**Mt££J& 








114 



Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all -important 
whole child. Each grade level specializes in exploratory 
and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle 
School we work in a "team" approach. Teaching blocks are 
longer for in-depth learning; technology is readily 
available and class size is limited for maximum skill 
building. It is a cooperative venture. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether 
it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful courtyard complete 
with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by our 
tiger mascot — there is something for everyone here at IMS. 







Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in 
the spring at an environmental camp, Ferry Beach in Saco, 
Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form close 
bonds with the students. The outdoor marine curriculum is 
high interest, and many new friends and relationships are 
forged. 



Grade seven students spend four days in canoes on the 
Ipswich River, seeing first hand where their river begins 
and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and 
marsh, collecting data all the way. They finish their trip 
paddling from the tov/n wharf to arrive at Hog Island. 



115 



Grade eight students spend four days in early June in the 
Adirondack^ in upper state New York. A science focus helps 
prepare them for visits to chasms and caves as well as the 
impressive Olympic Training Facility in Lake Placid. It is 
a wonderful culminating experience for them as they leave 
Middle School. 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for 
all interested students and their families, and we 
understand the need for students to be busy and supervised 
after the last school bell rings. We offer many enriching 
programs to meet the interests of all types of children. 
Our drama, dance and music departments involve more than 
half of our student population. Student athletes 
participate in sports programs that teach skills, 
sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak of intramural 
basketball season, more than 250 students are involved. We 
offer golf, tennis, soccer, softball, hockey, volleyball, 
ping pong, field hockey, basketball, art club, music 
programs, drama and monthly dances. 

We teach a course called "People Smarts" which focuses on 
interpersonal skills and multiple intelligences. Our 
parents have formed a Respect and Responsibility Committee 
helping us to produce workshops and assemblies in an effort 
to promote kindness and reduce bullying. Parents are very 
pleased with the frequent Fireside Topic evenings that 
tackle tough concepts and adolescent development. The 
Principal's Office is packed monthly with an informal 
"Coffee with the Principal" providing an opportunity for 
parents to come in and touch base with the latest news at 
IMS. 

A monthly "service" component has taken the form of food 
pantry, linen and coat drives. We filled a 10 wheeler with 
backpacks and uniforms for three school districts in the 
path of Hurricane Katrina. We also participate in the 
annual "Walk for Hunger" where together we walk an 8-mile 
circuit to raise funds for the homeless shelters on the 
North Shore. Community service is at the backbone of our 
mission. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting 
learning environment. Our outstanding professional faculty 
works diligently to clarify our vision for education— that 
every child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways 
to reach and teach all children who come to our school— they 



116 



are after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an exciting 
time to be working with young people. Our slogan is "making 
a difference starts here." We believe that, we love our 
work, and we invite you to join us. 



**-*-* + * + * 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

This was an exciting year for education at the Doyon School. 
The adventure of preparing youth for an ever-evolving future 
continues to be a challenging one, requiring our best efforts 
and energies, especially in times when resources are tight. 
This past year the Doyon Team did another extraordinary job in 
meeting these challenges and in implementing a high quality, 
creative and stimulating educational program. 

Our vision statement, "Preparing for Life Through Learning," 
underscores the importance we associate with relevancy: prior 
to lessons and activities, we ask ourselves, "when will our 
students actually utilize that which we are teaching." Our 
efforts in terms of academics this past year were highlighted 
by continuing initiatives in the area of Literacy. Once again 
we engaged in a partnership with Tufts University to bring the 
very best of professional development training to our 
classroom faculty. During the past year we engaged in a 
variety of in-house formats to enable the staff of the Center 
for Applied Child Development (CACD) of Tufts to meet with 
teachers on-site here at Doyon. We had whole-faculty 
meetings, seminars according to the topics teachers were most 
interested in, demonstration lessons and grade level 
workshops. In addition, we have re-structured our faculty 
meeting times to allow for more teacher-to-teacher 
professional dialogue and sharing of expertise v/ith a focus on 
reading comprehension skills and strategies. All of this was 
made possible by funds from the Elementary School Golf 
Tournament, since no money has been available in our budget 
for professional development for some time. We are also 
exceptionally grateful to the Doyon Friends of Ipswich 
Elementary School ( F. R. I . E. S . ) v/ho once again made a 
substantial investment in the breath and scope of reading 
resources by donating $15,000 to our school library for non- 
fiction books. Our third annual "Writers Week," was a great 
success, with multiple visits from professional and amateur 
v/riters and poets. Thanks again to the Doyon F.R.I.E.S. for 
funding and coordinating. Just a quick note on MCAS test 



117 



scores: the math and language arts/reading results this past 
year exceeded all past scores--our best results ever. 

This past year we continued our character development 
initiative, our "Stop and Think" program, and our Responsive 
Classroom training for new staff. Thanks to Ipswich Citizens 
for Education, we were once again able to fund our after- 
school "Student Leadership Team," (SLT) with fifteen faculty 
and staff mentors working with more than 90 fourth and fifth 
grade students. We believe that in providing students with 
opportunities to contribute to our school and to our community 
(and to the world, really, as we raised funds for a fishing 
boat for an Indian village decimated by the tsunami) , we are 
having a positive impact on students' sense of responsibility, 
empathy for others, and also their self-esteem. We are also ■* 
fortunate to be working in conjunction with Rotary in an Early 
Act initiative as part of our SLT. 

Our custodial crew continues to amaze: this past year after 
the summer break, as we began our building's 40th year; 
instead of looking a year older, our building looked younger. 
A new walkway was added to the playground from the cafeteria 
complete with a small patio, the floor in the cafe was 
replaced with beautiful blue tile, and the old original light 
fixtures were replaced by energy efficient lights that provide 
more light while consuming less energy. Plans have also been 
finalized to replace all the remaining original windows with 
energy efficient windows (with screens!). Doyon doesn't look 
its age; and with diligence, attention and some modest funding 
it should remain a viable facility for many years to come. 

Funding continues to be a problem. I am told we are in the 
midst of a "structural deficit," which means that given 
increases in mandated "fixed costs," (for example in insurance 
and energy) we will continue to have to cut discretionary 
funding given the limits of local and state revenues and the 
proposition 2 1/2 cap. The only cure we are told is a change 
in the state Chapter 70 formula. Meanwhile, we have zero 
funding for technology, for professional development, and less 
and less for many other "things" teachers could use. Most 
disturbing, we seem each year to also lose staf f--sometimes we 
lose a program (e.g., the "Enhanced Learning Program," our 
instructional technology assistant, and our librarian) , and 
sometimes we lose a classroom teacher which increases class 
size. This is not a good direction for a system that expects 
(and that is expected by this community I think) to keep 
getting better. 



118 



On this, the occasion of my nineteenth annual report, I would 
like to extend a special thanks to all in the Ipswich 
Community who have become part of the extended Doyon Community 
by volunteering and also contributing on the revenue side--we 
literally could not do this without you. I am of course very 
fortunate to be able to spend my working hours with a 
delightful and hard-working student body, and with the very 
talented and dedicated faculty and staff of the Doyon School-- 
it is a pleasure and an honor to work with them. 



******** 



WINTHROP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

The Winthrop School staff continues to spark an excitement 
for learning in our students through engaging, meaningful 
and thoughtful experiences. Their dedication to our dynamic 
learning community and their commitment to high quality 
instructional models particularly in light of reductions 
and elimination of programs and staff in our budget are 
commendable. 

For a second year, through outside funding sources (Golf 
Tournament proceeds and grants) , the Doyon and Winthrop 
Schools were able to work with Tufts University to 
customize literacy opportunities for teachers with a 
concentration on effective reading comprehension 
strategies. This has assisted us in meeting the needs of 
our students and strengthening our reading program. 

Our annual school-wide theme - CONNECTIONS - has unified 
the school with several challenges. Students and teachers 
started the year by making connections to each other 
through common activities. They graphed what they had in 
common, learned more about their classmates, and reached a 
better understanding of differences. The second challenge 
was to bring community members into classrooms to share how 
they are connected to Ipswich. 

The past four years of financial constraints eroded our 
budget to such an extent that there was a significant 
negative impact on the educational opportunities available 
for our students. We have lost staff members, programs, 
equipment, technology, professional development, library 
and classroom books, and building improvement projects, 
etc. 



119 



Contributions from the following groups made a significant 
difference to the Winthrop community, and we are grateful: 

The Friends of Ipswich Elementary Schools (FRIES) 
funded special assemblies with outstanding cultural and 
educational programs as well as playground projects. They 
also supported teacher requests and our library. 

The Volunteers In School (VIS) program provided many 
volunteers to our school. Senior citizens, high school 
students, and parents assisted students by generously 
dedicating their time and energy. 

Ipswich Citizens for Education (ICE) funded after 
school programs, such as Homework Club and Student 
Leadership Council. 

Individual family donations allowed us to fund field 
trips, laptops for our wireless mobile laptop cart, and 
many of our basic school supplies. 

Winthrop educates 500 students in a 50 year old preschool 
to Grade 5 elementary school with approximately 80 staff 
members and 100 volunteers. There have been many occasions 
when the Fire and Police Departments as well as the 
Department of Public Works assisted us with emergencies and 
unexpected dilemmas. Once again, we wish to thank all 
these town departments who worked so closely with us and 
ensured the safety of Winthrop students and their families. 

The support and ongoing partnership received from the Town 
of Ipswich is appreciated by the Winthrop staff, parents, 
and students. Please feel free to visit our school and 
v/itness firsthand the enthusiasm for learning generated 
from our students. They are a remarkable group of children 
who are proud to showcase their school. 



120 



-*-** + -*-*•* 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

Another year has gone by for Special Education with little 
change in our successful programming and model for delivery 
of services. This past year, however, we did address and 
put forward programs for our ever increasing autistic 
population. 

With a strong support system of special education teachers 
and therapists, our learning disabled students, without 
exception, were able to pass the MCAS testing for 
graduation. Only a very few students across the district, 
with more serious disabilities, were given the alternative 
testing and would not be eligible for a diploma. 

In all the schools, we continue the implementation of a 
program manager model for directing all aspects of the 
federal and state mandates for a free and appropriate 
education for all children with disabilities. This model 
fulfills the requirement of some level of alternative 
education for all students who demonstrate an inability to 
learn in the traditional classroom. 

We look forward to a year of self-evaluation and activities 
responsive to the compliance requirements of the 
Massachusetts Department of Education. 



~k~k~k'k-k-k-k~k 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Tone Kenney, Chairman 

The final home dedication through Cape Ann Habitat for 
Humanity has been completed. Three new families are proud 
homeowners with the assistance of several agencies. 

The Ipswich Housing Authority' s involvement dates back to 
years in the making. The Ipswich Housing Authority owned 
property at 219 Linebrook Road with the intention of 
developing more family housing units. The Town of Ipswich 
owned the property at 21-23 Essex Road, formerly the White 
Lion site. In 2001, the Town of Ipswich and Ipswich 
Housing Authority entered into a land swap agreement. 



121 



The Ipswich Housing Authority Board of Commissioners 
contacted Cape Ann Habitat for Humanity to assist their 
organization with providing additional first time homebuyer 
units . 

The Ipswich Housing Authority developed a 167 four-unit 
Group Home on 27 Essex Road and donated the back land to 
Cape Ann Habitat for Humanity. Cape Ann Habitat for 
Humanity's Organization constructed three (3) first 
homebuyer units. 

The Ipswich Housing Authority Board of Commissioners goal 
is to develop more affordable housing units throughout the 
Ipswich Community. 



kkkkkkkk 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Dorothy Laurence, Chair 

Massachusetts Cultural Council allocated Ipswich Cultural 
Council $2,500 for grants to be awarded to organizations and 
individual artists supporting cultural activities that 
benefit our town. An additional $625 from the sale of art 
work at the Ipswich Art Show and a re-grant of $300 made a 
total of $3,425 granted to eleven successful applicants from 
a pool of nineteen. Applicants who were awarded grants 
represent a variety of fields including visual arts, music, 
literature and dance. Both Winthrop and Doyon Schools were 
among the recipients. Additional grant information is 
available at www.mass-culture.org/lcc_j5ublic.asp. 

The Nineteenth Annual Art Show, held at the EBSCO Riverside 
Cafe and chaired by Peg Connolly Graney, represented a wide 
variety of visual art forms, a Poetry Reading, and 
Interpretive Dance Performance. 

ICC meetings at Town Hall are open to the public. New 
members are welcome. 

OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton and Carolyn Britt Co-Chairs 

During 2005, the Open Space Committee continued to work 
with the Planning Board to review new subdivision plans. 



122 



This past year we have commented on many MOB" projects. 
We have also been working with the Planning Department in 
laying the groundwork to establish management plans for 
town-owned open space. The focus of this effort has been 
on the parcels nev/ly acquired or otherwise protected under 
the Open Space Bond. A new Bond administrator, David 
Koonce, came on board in 2005 and has attended all of our 
monthly meeting. As was the case with his predecessor, he 
spends a considerable portion of his time researching 
grants and exploring cooperative arrangements that would 
facilitate the protection of priority open space parcels. 

The Open Space Committee has finished revising the Town' s 
five-year Open Space and Recreation Plan. The new plan, 
covering the years 2006-2010, will be on the town web site 
with copies available from the Town Clerk. As always, we 
welcome interested citizens to our meetings. 

• ••*■*■*•-*■•*•* 

HALL HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens 
Stephanie Gaskins 
Co-chairs 

The Hall-Haskell-House continues to not only be well 
positioned as a Visitor Center to welcome guests to 
Ipswich, but also a wonderful historic structural part of 
the streetscape that is so important visually as an 
entrance into our community We on the committee are 
pleased to have been a part of that long continuous 
process . 

The Visitor Center continues to be a hub of activity. 
Under the supervision of Bill Nelson and Louise Ciolek, 
volunteer-coordinator, the center is open seven days a 
week. It is manned by forty-five volunteers ranging in age 
from 50 to 90. They are all most welcoming, have a great 
sense of humor, and know and love their community. Stop by 
one day to observe, and you will walk away with a great 
feeling of pride in the people who give of their time with 
so much warmth and enthusiasm to fellow visitors. 

This year, 5,500 tourists were greeted at the Center. Most 
visitors are from the United States with a good 
representation from other countries. Each year a thank you 
luncheon is given in honor of the volunteers, and this 



123 



year's host was Trudy Markos. We thank her for her 
hospitality. 

Artists also continue to be interested in using the gallery 
space for their exhibits. It gives us great pleasure to 
follow them from their first exhibition at the Hall-Haskell 
House on to larger venues. We are delighted that they have 
a beginning with this gallery. Forty-six artists display 
their work during the thirty-six weeks that the gallery was 
open. 

The Visitor Center is open from May 1 st to October 31 st . The 
gallery is a wonderful space for tourists and townspeople 
to visit and appreciate the talent of these wonderful 
artists. Thanks for a great year. 

IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Eliot, Chair 

This year the Committee continued to work on the portion of 
the Bay Circuit Trail that goes along the southern edge of 
the Country Club through Conservation land and Marini's 
Farm to Willowdale State Forest. All necessary approvals 
have been obtained. A contractor has been selected, bridge 
design done, and a bid submitted to the committee. Work is 
planned for the summer of 2006. All that remains is to 
obtain financing. 

The new Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswich is 
complete, selling well, and can be purchased at local 
stores. The new Guide includes digital maps, new sketches 
of the flora through a grant from the Ipswich Arts Council, 
and text revisions as needed. 

The Committee continues to consult with Turner Hill to 
insure that trails are open and are well marked. As land 
is developed, the Committee continues to work with the Open 
Space Committee, Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
to see that trails are preserved and kept open for the 
enjoyment of residents. 

The Committee is working with Bio Labs to monitor the 
trails there. 



124 



Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, 
advertised in the Chronicle and led by members of the 
Committee. This informal walking/hiking group continues 
to meet at the Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 
9:30 a.m. to explore local trails. 



-A-******* 



TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Robert K. Weatherall, Chair 
Walter Pojasek, Vice Chair 
Jean Emerson 

The Commission voted in July to begin investing the funds 
in the Commission' s care in a mix of securities that could 
grow in value over time while producing an acceptable 
income. Since the beginning of the last century, the Town's 
trust funds have been invested only in income-producing 
securities, none in stocks. While the principal in the 
funds has retained its nominal value, its purchasing power 
has been eaten away by inflation. An example is a $5,000 
bequest left to the town in 1944. While the principal 
remains unscathed in accounting terms, it has lost over 90% 
of its purchasing power. 

In light of the economy' s uncertain direction, the 
Commission voted to start cautiously, building in stages 
its investment in equity up to a 35/65 allocation between 
equity and fixed income. Just under 28% of the assets under 
the Commission' s care were in equity securities at the end 
of the calendar year. At year end, the market value of the 
Commission' s equity holdings was up slightly, while the 
value of its holdings on the fixed income side was down 
slightly, hurt by rising interest rates. 

Earlier in the year, when the funds in the Commission's 
care were still entirely invested in fixed income 
securities, and rising interest rates reduced the market 
value of the funds, fund income was drawn on (as in 2004) 
to bring the principal in the funds back to par. In the 
case of several funds, this reduced the income available 
for spending for the purposes the donors had in mind. 

The provisions of three scholarship funds give the 
Commission the task of choosing the scholars. In May the 
Commission awarded $1,500 from the income available to 
Daniel H. Boufford from the Pauline Ross Claxton fund, 



125 



$1,500 to Caitlin M. Phaneuf from the Marion Ross Humphrey 
fund, and $500 to Jessie Soffron from the Cornelius 
Thibeault fund. 



•k-k-k-k-k-k-k-k 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of 
the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" as published 
in the Federal Register on July 26, 1991. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, 
employees, and job applicants that no qualified individual 
with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be 
excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of 
the services, programs, activities, or employment 
opportunities in the Town of Ipswich, or be subjected to 
discrimination by the Town. A "qualified individual with a 
disability" means an individual with a disability who, with 
or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or 
practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or 
transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids 
and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements 
for the receipt of services, the participation in programs 
or activities, and access to job opportunities in the Town. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or 
office) as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply with 
this requirement. Inquiries should be directed to: 



Name : 
Office: 
Address : 

Phone Number 
Hours : 



Colleen E. Fermon 

ADA Coordinator, Health Office 

Town Hall, 25 Green Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 

(978) 356-6605 

00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs 

00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



126 











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152 



THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR 
SERVICE 

A handy Check-List of Often-Used 

Town Services: 

978 Area Code: 

Administration 

Town Manager 356-6609 

Accounting 

Finance Director 356-6601 

Ambulance 

Business 356-9800 

Emergency 911 

Assessments 

Assessors 356-6603 

Building & Health 

Building Inspector 356-6605 

Code Enforcement 356-6605 

Gas Inspector 356-0523 

Health Agent 356-6605 

Plumbing Inspector 356-0523 

Business Association 356-9055 

Cemetery & Parks 

Office 356-6643 

Civil Defense 

Emergency Management ... 356-6645 

Council on Aging 356-6650 

Court 

Third District Court .. .462-2652 

Crane Beach 

Gate 356-4354 

Castle Hill 356-4351 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound 356-6652 

Animal Control Officer. 356-4343 

Electric Department 

Office 356-6635 

Fire Department 

Business 356-4321 

Emergency 911 

Fire Prevention 356-6631 

Harbormaster 356-4343 

Historical Society 356-2811 



Housing Authority 

Office 356-2860 

Ipswich Chronicle. . .412-1805 

Library 356-6648 

Mosquito Control 474-4640 

Parking Clerk 356-6611 

Planning & Development 

Town Planner 356-6607 

Planning Board. .. .356-6607 
Conservation 356-6661 

Police Department 

Business 356-4343 

Emergency 911 

Shellfish Info 356-6671 

Public Works Department 

Office 356-6612 

Recycling 356-6612 

Trash Collection. .356-6612 

Purchasing Office. . .356-6608 

Recreation Department 

Office 356-6644 

Registry of Motor. 800-858-3926 

School Department 

Administration. . . .356-2935 

High School 356-3137 

Middle School 356-3535 

Winthrop School ... 356-2976 
Doyon School 356-5506 

Selectmen 

Office 356-6604 

Town Clerk 

Office 356-6600 

Treasurer /Collector 

Office 356-6610 

Veterans Services 

Veterans Agent. .. .356-3915 

Water Department 

Office 356-6637 

Water Treatment 356-6639 

Utilities 356-6635 

MIS Department 356-6670 

Visitors Center 356-8540